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July 31, 2014

Retiring Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter has already raked in some serious swag as he makes the ballpark rounds during his final season, but the Texas Rangers aggressively upped the gift ante on Wednesday night.

Retired Rangers Michael Young and Ivan Rodriguez presented Jeter with a pair of personalized cowboy boots — nice and all, but then a video of former President George W. Bush played during the pre-game ceremony. When the video finished, the real Bush (who is also a former owner of the Rangers) walked onto the field and offered Jeter a signed photograph of the pair in the Rangers' batting cage.

Jeter and Bush crossed paths a few weeks after the September 11 attacks, when the president threw out a first pitch in Game three of the 2001 World Series. Jeter warned his commander-in-chief, "Don't bounce it. They'll boo you."

Bush reportedly repeated the line back to Jeter on Thursday, which is quite charming. But let's be real: Most memorable from the typical photo ops that follow these presentations is Bush's head-tap of Rodriguez, below. --Sarah Eberspacher

(Deadspin)

6:57 p.m. ET
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A new ABC News/Washington Post poll finds in the wake of the deadly Charlottesville white supremacist rally, 37 percent of Americans approve of President Trump's job performance while 58 percent disapprove.

When it comes to how he responded to the incident in Charlottesville, just 28 percent approve compared to 56 percent who do not. The poll also found that nine percent of respondents, the equivalent of 22 million Americans, believe it is acceptable to hold white supremacist or neo-Nazi views, and 10 percent support the alt-right movement, while 50 percent oppose it. The poll, a random sample of 1,014 adults, was conducted August 16-20 in English and Spanish, on landlines and cell phones. The margin of sampling error is 3.5 points. Catherine Garcia

3:59 p.m. ET

To everyone who missed Monday's total eclipse: Don't worry, you've got another shot at seeing one on April 8, 2024. In exactly 6 years, 7 months, and 18 days, the moon will once again eclipse the sun.

While Monday's eclipse spanned from Oregon to South Carolina, the 2024 eclipse will be visible from Mexico up to Canada, crossing the paths of American cities including Dallas, Indianapolis, and Cleveland. Take a look at the map below, and start planning for 2024. Becca Stanek

3:33 p.m. ET

On Monday, President Trump stared directly at the sun during the solar eclipse and proceeded to give the moon a big thumbs up. As Trump snuck a peek sans glasses, defying common sense and the advice of scientists, a bystander reportedly shouted: "Don't look."

The president watched the rare event from the White House's Truman Balcony. He was joined by first lady Melania Trump and their 11-year-old son Barron, neither of whom appeared to look directly at the sun without the necessary protective eyewear, which is intended to prevent permanent eye damage.

Watch Trump watch the eclipse below. Becca Stanek

3:00 p.m. ET

On Monday afternoon, portions of the United States fell dark as the moon eclipsed the sun. For those who missed the rare coast-to-coast event — or for those who simply want to relive its spectacular beauty — check out some photos and videos of the total solar eclipse below. Becca Stanek

1:39 p.m. ET
JOSE JORDAN/AFP/Getty Images

Spanish police confirmed Monday that they shot and killed 22-year-old Younes Abouyaaquob, the man suspected to have driven the van down Barcelona's La Rambla on Thursday in a terrorist attack that killed 13 people in the city center. Police shot Abouyaaquob in the outskirts of Subirats, a region west of Barcelona, after an extensive manhunt took place over the weekend. He was apparently wearing a fake suicide belt.

Abouyaaquob escaped from Thursday's crash scene on foot and was believed to be the last remaining member of a wider terrorist cell suspected of planning last week's attacks in Barcelona and the coastal city of Cambrils, where another vehicle attack killed one and injured six. Kimberly Alters

1:20 p.m. ET

GOP Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) isn't so sure President Trump will be the Republican Party's presidential nominee in 2020. While Trump apparently doesn't think it's too early to start campaigning for 2020 — he's holding a campaign-style rally Tuesday night in Phoenix, after all — Collins said in a MSNBC interview Monday that she thinks it's "far too early to tell now" what the future will hold for Trump.

"Do you think he will end up the party's nominee in 2020?" MSNBC's Hallie Jackson asked. "It's too difficult to say," Collins said.

Collins, notably, did not support Trump as the party's nominee in 2016, and she was one of three Republicans to oppose the party's ObamaCare repeal. At this point, Collins said she is particularly disappointed in Trump's hesitancy to directly condemn white supremacists in the wake of the Charlottesville, Virginia, white nationalist rally. "I think the president failed to meet the standard we should have expected a president to do in a time like that," Collins said.

Watch the interview below. Becca Stanek

1:08 p.m. ET

The New York Times has been talking about today's total eclipse since 1932. On Monday, ahead of the solar eclipse that will sweep the country from Oregon to South Carolina, the Times shared an archived clip from 85 years ago that accurately predicted the totality of today's eclipse:


Citing a study by Dr. S.A. Mitchell, director of the Leander McCormick Observatory of the University of Virginia, the Times warned that if viewers didn't catch the Aug. 31, 1932 eclipse, they'd be waiting until Aug. 21, 2017 for "conditions that are really favorable and promise scientific success."

With that prediction seemingly coming true, we'll have to wait and see if the Times is also right in predicting the next similarly phenomenal solar eclipse — mark your calendars for April 8, 2024. Becca Stanek

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