Not that there's anything wrong with that
July 24, 2014
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July marked the 25th anniversary of the premiere of NBC's Seinfeld, which is routinely held up as one of the greatest sitcoms in television history — but anyone hoping that we might someday get the chance to revisit Jerry, George, Elaine, and Kramer in anything longer than a Curb Your Enthusiasm episode or a Super Bowl commercial is still out of luck.

In a recent "Ask Me Anything" on Reddit, Seinfeld reiterated that he has no interest in revisiting his legendary sitcom:

"I think it would be lame, and I think it would be an embarrassment to the nice place that the show occupies. I'm absolutely happy keeping it the way it is. You can't keep asking for more of certain things, you know? One of the keys to life is having a sense of proportion, knowing how long to sit at a restaurant after you've eaten, or how long you should go on vacation — if you go to Hawaii for a month on vacation, I guarantee you that by the end you'll hate it. So it's the same with a TV show, you want to do a certain amount of it, so that when people look back on it and they love it. I could have easily done the show for one or two or three more years, but it would have changed the way people look back at it. I think I made the right decision. Because people like the show now even more than they did in the 1990s, because it didn't get worn out."

To read more of Seinfeld's AMA, click over to Reddit. Scott Meslow

Iran and the bomb
12:10 p.m. ET
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Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Sunday accused the U.S. of fabricating tales of Iranian nuclear weapons.

"They created the myth of nuclear weapons so they could say the Islamic Republic is a source of threat," Khamenei said in an address to military commanders. "No, the source of threat is America itself, with its unrestrained, destabilizing interventions."

The remark came one day before nuclear negotiations between Iran, the U.S., and five world powers were to resume. The negotiators have until June 30 to reach a final accord. Jon Terbush

2016 Watch
11:39 a.m. ET
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Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) says he will almost certainly get into the 2016 White House race.

"If I can raise the money, I'll do it," Graham said on Fox News Sunday. When pressed to say how seriously he was considering a presidential bid, Graham pegged his odds of running at the oddly specific "91 percent."

In January, Graham launched a presidential exploratory committee. Sens. Ted Cruz (Texas), Rand Paul (Ky.), and Marco Rubio (Fla.) are the only major GOP candidates to formally declare their candidacies for the White House. Jon Terbush

Foot meet mouth
11:13 a.m. ET
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Poland on Sunday summoned the U.S. ambassador to protest FBI Director James Comey's recent comment casting some blame on Poland for the Holocaust.

"The murderers and accomplices of Germany, and Poland, and Hungary, and so many, many other places didn't do something evil," Comey said in a speech last week, which was then adapted as an opinion piece in The Washington Post. "They convinced themselves it was the right thing to do, the thing they had to do."

Poland's ambassador to the U.S. denounced the comment as "unacceptable" and a "falsification of history." Soon after, the U.S. Ambassador in Warsaw, Stephen Mull, told reporters that suggestions anyone "apart from the Nazi Germany was responsible for the Holocaust are wrong, harmful and offensive." Jon Terbush

2016 Watch
10:56 a.m. ET
Darren McCollester / Getty Images

A slew of declared and potential Republican presidential candidates trekked to New Hampshire this weekend for the two-day Republican Leadership Summit. Close to 20 prospective candidates — ranging from establishment types like New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Jeb Bush, to bottom-tier hopefuls like Donald Trump and John Bolton — used their stage time to discuss policy, ding the president, and assail presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

"When Hillary Clinton travels, there's going to need to be two planes," Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) said. "One for her and her entourage, and one for her baggage."

Also at the event, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker said Clinton represented "the third term of Barack Obama," former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee denounced the "Clinton political machine," and Sen. Ted Cruz (Texas) quipped that Clinton was not at the event because it was not being bankrolled by foreign interests. Jon Terbush

Oops?
9:11 a.m. ET
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Almost every examiner in the FBI's hair analysis unit repeatedly overhyped evidence to aid prosecutors over a two-decade period ending in 2000, according to The Washington Post.

The finding comes from an ongoing review of cases conducted by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the Innocence Project in conjunction with the federal government. Per the review, 26 of 28 forensic hair analysts overstated evidence in 95 percent of the 268 trials examined so far.

The FBI and Justice Department acknowledged the errors, saying in a statement they were "committed to ensuring that affected defendants are notified of past errors and that justice is done in every instance."

Read the whole report here. Jon Terbush

This just in
7:58 a.m. ET
Tullio M. Puglia / Getty Images

An estimated 500 to 700 people went missing on Sunday after a boat ferrying migrants to Italy capsized north of Libya in the Mediterranean Sea.

The 65-foot-long fishing boat sent a distress call overnight, but when another vessel approached the migrants huddled to the far side of the ship, causing it to capsize, according to the Italian Coast Guard. Close to 20 ships raced to the site of the tragedy, and rescuers have pulled 28 people from the water so far.

Roughly 900 people are believed to have died this year trying to cross the sea to Italy. Jon Terbush

water wars
April 18, 2015
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California's State Water Resources Control Board released modified proposed conservation restrictions on Saturday, adjusting the planned cuts based on conservation efforts that have already been made by various communities, the Los Angeles Times reports.

A former draft divided water suppliers into four tiers; the new framework places them into one of nine tiers, "to more equitably allocate" cuts. The Associated Press reports that officials from cities which had proactively begun drought-saving efforts were frustrated with the board's original proposal, which answered Gov. Jerry Brown's executive order requiring a 25-percent cutback in urban water usage.

"The fact that we are being dinged additional costs doesn't seem fair,” John Helminski, San Diego's assistant director of public utilities, told AP.

Across the state, depending on their tier, water suppliers will be expected to cut total daily water use by anywhere from 8 percent to 36 percent. Water suppliers that do not meet their cut could face fines of up to $10,000 per day. The board is expected to vote on the revised framework proposal in early May. Sarah Eberspacher

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