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mistakes
July 16, 2014
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Wednesday was not a good day for government agencies that deal with infectious agents.

Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was in the hot seat during a hearing held by a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee. Frieden was grilled about unsafe practices at the CDC, which resulted in employees being exposed to anthrax spores and other dangerous samples.

Last month, the anthrax was sent from one lab to another without being killed off, and could have infected people along the way. It was a "tipping point," Friedan said, showing the CDC that it needs to take a hard look at safety procedures. A memo by the subcommittee stated that employees did not know how to decontaminate the laboratory, physical exams were delayed, and the amount and location of the anthrax bacteria weren't recorded. A molecular biologist, Richard H. Ebright, testified that it is a conflict of interest for the CDC to fund and conduct research while overseeing its safety practices. He suggested that an independent agency regulate the research instead.

Officials also announced that the vials of freeze-dried smallpox found in a Food and Drug Administration lab on July 1 were part of a larger collection that included 327 vials of dengue, influenza, Q fever, and other infectious agents. While a few of the vials were destroyed, most were sent to the National Bioforensic Analysis Center, and officials said they were not sure if any of the materials ever posed a threat. Catherine Garcia

it's just business
1:30 a.m. ET
Facebook.com/FlynnsRestaurant

After asking a diner to take her crying toddler outside and being told to "f—k off," an Australian chef and restaurant owner decided the time had come to ban children under the age of seven from eating in his establishment.

Liam Flynn, who has operated Flynn's in Yungaburra, Queensland, for 14 years, shared the news in a Facebook post, which was met with both enthusiasm and disappointment. "We've had mums and parents who feel that it's just outright discrimination, but it's mostly been positive,” he told Business Insider. "I've had a lot of support. ... There are a lot of parents out there who understand where we're coming from."

Over the past weekend, it became clear he made the right decision: Flynn's had its best Saturday and Sunday ever in terms of sales. "Business is booming," he said. "People are spending up large, drinking fine wine." It's important to note that while children under seven are asked to stay at home, dogs of any age are welcome at Flynn’s any time. Catherine Garcia

last night on late night
12:58 a.m. ET

Rapper and actor Ice T has a voice that's instantly recognizable — as long as you've sat through at least one Law & Order: SVU marathon, you know it when you hear it. Thanks to The Tonight Show, we now have an idea of what it would have sounded like if he had voiced some of our favorite cartoon characters, including Papa Smurf and Grumpy Bear. Sure, they're a whole lot edgier than they were originally, but only a Care Bear voiced by Ice T could get away with talking about turning a Roomba into a bong. Watch the clip (which has some strong language) below. Catherine Garcia

campaign 2016
12:18 a.m. ET
Jan Kruger/Getty Images

It looks like Donald Trump won't be giving away rides on his luxurious, ultra-classy helicopter in Iowa this summer after all.

After initially telling The Daily Mail that he was going to attend "The World's Fair," the GOP presidential candidate clarified on Wednesday that he was really planning on flying his chopper out to Iowa for the state fair. "I'm going to try giving kids lifts in the helicopter," he said. "You know, young kids. Yeah! If I can do it — if I'm allowed to do it. ... It'll be magnificent."

Unfortunately for Trump, it's going to remain a magnificent dream. A spokeswoman for the fair told the Des Moines Register that Trump has not asked for permission, and if he does, he'll be denied. "He is welcome to land his helicopter anywhere outside the grounds and take people on rides or whatever he would like to do," she said. "But that will not be happening on Iowa State Fair grounds." Catherine Garcia

the heat is on
July 30, 2015

It may have felt hot where you were on Thursday, but unless you spent time in Bandar Mahshahr, Iran, you have nothing to complain about.

The temperature there climbed to 109 degrees Fahrenheit, but the humidity made it "feel like" it was 154 degrees, meteorologist Anthony Sagliani tweeted. It cooled off a bit overnight, but on Friday morning at 6:30 a.m., it was already 88 degrees and feeling like 108, the Weather Channel reports. It's supposed to hit 116 degrees later in the day, so keep the people — and air conditioners — of Bandar Mahshahr in your thoughts. Catherine Garcia

closing time
July 30, 2015

A Civil War-era facility at the Baltimore City Detention Center that critics say should have been "condemned decades ago" will finally be shut down, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) announced Thursday.

The governor considers the Men's Detention Center, which houses 750 pretrial inmates, a "black eye" and "embarrassment" to the state. The inmates will be moved to other detention centers, officials said, but the women's jail, central booking facility, and other pretrial buildings will stay open. By closing the facility, Maryland will save between $10 million and $15 million annually "without compromising detainees' access to legal protections," Stephen T. Moyer, secretary of public safety and correctional services, said.

In 2013, federal prosecutors charged several people, including corrections officers, with letting a gang operate a drug-trafficking and money laundering ring from inside the facility, The Washington Post reports. Hogan said it "makes no sense to keep this deplorable facility open. ... The practice of continuously dumping hard-earned taxpayer money into this disastrous facility will not continue under my watch," and pinned the center's woes on previous administrations, who "ignored" what was going on.

Democratic state lawmakers and union officials criticized Hogan for not discussing the shutdown with them before it was announced. Advocates like David Fathi, director of the ACLU's National Prison Project, told the Post it's a move in the right direction, but won't solve a host of other problems. "This critical step...will have no impact on the dangerous physical conditions and shockingly deficient medical and mental health care in the jail facilities that will remain open," he said. Catherine Garcia

public health
July 30, 2015

In New York City, two people have died in a Legionnaires' disease outbreak, with 31 cases reported in the South Bronx since mid-July.

In the Bronx, water cooling towers at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center and a commercial complex have tested positive for the disease, Capital New York reports. Legionnaires' disease is a respiratory bacterial infection that is not transmitted from person to person but rather through water mist from showers, cooling towers, and air conditioning. A 1976 outbreak in Philadelphia, which mostly affected people attending an American Legion convention, led to its name. Symptoms include fever, chills, and a cough, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control says that most people recover, but five to 30 percent of those who come down with the disease die.

Officials will test the water from other potential sources in the area, CNN reports, but Dr. Mary Bassett, commissioner of the New York City Health Department, said the city's water supply "does not pose a risk, so people should continue to feel confident in drinking tap water to stay cool during this period of hot weather." Mayor Bill de Blasio recommends that those who have symptoms get tested, but assured the public that most New Yorkers are not at risk Catherine Garcia

you got ghosted
July 30, 2015

ISIS fighters looking for love were instead taught a lesson in catfishing by three women in Chechnya.

The women have been arrested on charges of fraud after tricking the fighters into sending them money for plane tickets they never planned to purchase, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. One woman said she was contacted on social media by a militant in Syria, who asked her to come join him as a "jihadi bride." She said she didn't have enough money to get there, so he sent her 10,000 rubles ($167). Instead of buying a one-way ticket, she blocked him, kept the money, and moved onto two other targets (adding 35,000 rubles, or $585, to her coffers).

The woman told Russia's Life News that she actually was contemplating going to Syria, but decided against it because "a lot of people I know have gone, but it did not end well for any of them." All three are facing a maximum of six years in jail if convicted. Catherine Garcia

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