whoops
July 11, 2014
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Chuck Huey of Kingston, Pennsylvania was pretty confused when he received a notice in the mail warning his grandfather, Bert Huey, that if he didn't sign up for the draft he would face a fine and imprisonment.

Chuck is 73, and his grandfather, a World War I veteran, died in 1995 at the age of 100. "I said, 'Geez, what the hell is this about?'" he told The Associated Press. "We were just totally dumbfounded."

It turns out that the Selective Service System mistakenly sent more than 14,000 notices to men born in Pennsylvania between 1893 and 1897, telling them they had to register for the military draft or face punishment. The mix-up occurred when hundreds of thousands of records were transferred from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to the Selective Service. A clerk entering data did not check off the century people were born in, thus sending out notices to men born between 1993 and 1997, as well as 1893 and 1897.

The Selective Service said they are sorry for the error, and anyone who receives a notice for a long dead ancestor (the youngest would be turning 117 this year) is told to ignore the correspondence. Chuck Huey tried to straighten things out over the phone, but ended up even more frustrated as he couldn't ever speak to a live person. He said he went out of his way to try to settle the matter because "you just never know. You don't want to mess around with the federal government."

Watch this
2:36 p.m. ET
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If President Obama had The Rock's build, he would have a much easier time getting Republicans to do what he wants. Or, at least, he would have a much easier time tossing them out windows and ripping off their limbs when they made him angry, as was the case in this Saturday Night Live sketch featuring Dwayne Johnson as "The Rock Obama."

"Don't be alarmed," Johnson says after some maddening Republican subversion causes him to hulk out and rip through his suit. "The Rock Obama much like Barack Obama, only larger and more violent." —Jon Terbush

2016 Watch
1:45 p.m. ET
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Former Hewlett Packard CEO Carly Fiorina on Sunday crept closer to a White House bid, saying in an interview with Fox News there is a "higher than 90 percent" chance she will run.

"As other potential candidates are doing, we need to make sure we have the right team in place, that we have the right support," she said, adding that an announcement would likely come in late April or early May.

A political neophyte, Fiorina ran for Senate in California in 2010 but lost by a 10-point margin. A CNN poll earlier this month found her with less than one percent of the vote in a hypothetical GOP primary. —Jon Terbush

2016 Watch
12:57 p.m. ET
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Former Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley on Sunday took a none-too-subtle swipe at Hillary Clinton and Jeb Bush, the presumptive frontrunners for their parties' 2016 nominations.

"The presidency of the United States is not some crown to be passed between two families," O'Malley, himself a prospective White House candidate, said on ABC's This Week. "It is an awesome and sacred trust to be earned and exercised on behalf of the American people." —Jon Terbush


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The hunters become the hunted
12:27 p.m. ET
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What would Bambi look like with bulging muscles and an entourage of woodland gunmen? That's the question Saturday Night Live answered with a The Fast and the Furious meets Disney reboot staring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson as the titular orphaned deer.

"When I was a boy, they took away my mother," Johnson says in the faux trailer. "Now it's time for them to pay — dearly." —Jon Terbush

Iran and the bomb
11:51 a.m. ET
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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday assailed the emerging details of a nuclear agreement intended to curb Iran's nuclear program.

"This agreement, as it appears, confirms all of our concerns and even more so," he said.

The U.S. and Iran have three days left before the deadline to reach a framework deal.

This just in
11:21 a.m. ET
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Arab leaders on Sunday announced a tentative agreement to create a joint military force to combat violence and extremism in the region.

"We recognize the clear challenges in the Arab world and the need to take measures to combat them," Nabil al Araby, chairman of the Arab League, said on the final day of the group's summit in Egypt.

The announcement came days after a Saudi-led coalition began launching airstrikes in Yemen against the Houthi rebels who have overrun the country and forced President Abd Rabbu Mansour Hadi to flee.

Developing story
10:27 a.m. ET
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Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) said Saturday his state would move to "clarify" the intent of a controversial so-called religious freedom law that critics contend will allow businesses to discriminate against gays.

"I support religious liberty, and I support this law," Pence told the Indianapolis Star. "But we are in discussions with legislative leaders this weekend to see if there's a way to clarify the intent of the law."

The law, which will go into effect in July, bars the state from enacting legislation that could "substantially burden" the ability of people and businesses to practice their religious beliefs. Several high-profile businesses and figures have expressed concern over the law, or threatened to boycott the state.

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