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April 28, 2014
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To those even casually familiar with Donald Sterling's controversial ownership of the Los Angeles Clippers, his recorded remarks urging his mistress to not associate with black people were shocking, though not surprising. This is a man who paid $2.725 million to settle a Justice Department lawsuit claiming he drove minorities out of apartments he owned, and who allegedly asked a prospective coach how he would deal with "these ni--ers." And that's just for starters.

Sterling is also an unrepentant sexist. A brief history of his attitude toward women:

* A former employee sued Sterling for sexual harassment, alleging that he ordered her to find him masseuses who "will, you know, let me put it in or who [will] suck on it."

* He hired "hostesses" to work parties, one of whom called it the most "demoralizing, dehumanizing experience of my life," and claimed she was asked to provide semi-nude photos.

* Sterling's own testimony from a lawsuit with a former mistress, to whom he paid $500 every time she "provided sex" for him: "When you pay a woman for sex, you are not together with her... "You're paying her for a few moments to use her body for sex. Is it clear?"

*From the same testimony: "I wouldn't have a child and certainly not with that piece of trash. Come on. This girl is the lowest form."

*And again, in the same testimony: "Every secretary is honey. I'm a flowery man. If you're having sex with a woman you're paying for, you always call her honey because you can't remember her name."

*From an extended audio recording obtained by Deadspin: "If my girl can't do what I want, I don't want the girl. I'll find a girl that will do what I want!"

Donald Sterling, ladies and gentlemen. Jon Terbush

2:26 p.m. ET
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Chinese developers might have just single-handedly solved both the country's traffic and air pollution problems with their latest invention. The country's state news agency, Xinhua, reported Thursday that developers have come up with a bus called the Transit Explore Bus, which is elevated off the ground so that cars can drive underneath it. The bus would glide along on rails straddling two lanes of traffic, offer enough space for cars less than two meters high to pass underneath it, and be able to travel at speeds up to about 37 miles per hour.

While the bus is still in the planning stages, developers say it could cut down big time on traffic and, subsequently, the country's increasingly worrisome air pollution problem. One of the project's lead engineers, Song Youzhou, estimates this project would cost just 16 percent of the theoretical cost of an entirely new subway, and that construction of the bus would be much quicker than other alternatives. Youzhou says the bus would be powered by electricity and could replace as many as 40 regular buses, thanks to its carrying capacity of up to 1,400 passengers.

The first bus is set to be tested at the end of July or in August outside of China's Qinhuangdao City. Becca Stanek

2:26 p.m. ET

In case there was any question that this is Trump's world and we're just living in it:

Clinton, meanwhile, is in Las Vegas discussing her plans to raise incomes for working families. Jeva Lange

2:03 p.m. ET
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Ultraconservative Saudi cleric Saleh bin Fawzan al-Fawzan was recently shocked to learn that people take pictures with their cats, The Washington Post reports. Fawzan was then forced to clarify for his audience that, according to hard-line Islamic codes, cat selfies are strictly forbidden.

A member of the Saudi Council of Senior Scholars, Fawzan appeared on a television program in April that was recently translated into English by the Middle East Media Research Center. At one point in the appearance, someone off-screen tells the cleric that "taking pictures with cats has been spreading among people who want to be like the Westerners."

The cleric apparently can't believe his ears. "They are taking pictures with them," the person is forced to repeat.

Fawzan then stresses that such selfies are "prohibited," although "the cats here don't matter."

"Taking pictures is prohibited if not for a necessity, not with cats, not with dogs, not with wolves, not with anything," Fawzan says, citing a view held by some hard-line Islamic scholars who believe photos violate rules against depicting human or animal images.

However, it is not a view held by many in Saudi Arabia — in fact, ordinary Saudis take cat selfies a-plenty, just like anyone elsewhere. Jeva Lange

1:05 p.m. ET
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Baylor University fired head football coach Art Briles on Thursday as the program faces ongoing scrutiny following multiple allegations of assault and sexual assault. University President Ken Starr has also been removed, with the school announcing he will "transition to role of Chancellor."

Briles has been with Baylor for eight seasons, racking up a 65-37 record. However, the football program was engulfed in scandal when former Baylor student Jasmin Hernandez filed a lawsuit against Baylor alleging the university did not properly handle her 2012 report of rape by then-Baylor football team member Tevin Elliott. Elliot was later convicted, and is now serving a 20-year sentence. Two other former Baylor students also came forward during the trial to testify that they had been raped by Elliot.

In August 2014, another Baylor football player, Sam Ukwuachu, was found guilty of sexually assaulting a woman in 2013. Just last month, Shawn Oakman, also on the football team, was arrested on the suspicion of raping a woman although he has said the encounter was consensual. Additional allegations against Baylor football players have been revealed by Waco, Texas, police in the past week.

Law firm Pepper Hamilton was hired in September to look at the school's treatment of the sexual assault allegations, and reportedly presented its findings to the board of regents earlier in May. "We were horrified by the extent of these acts of sexual violence on our campus," regents chairman Richard Willis said in a statement. "This investigation revealed the University's mishandling of reports in what should have been a supportive, responsive, and caring environment for students. The depth to which these acts occurred shocked and outraged us." Jeva Lange

11:41 a.m. ET
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Ohio is poised to become the first state in the U.S. that actually might make its voters pay out of their own pockets to extend voting hours. On Wednesday, lawmakers approved a bill that would require voters to post a cash bond if they want polling hours extended past the normal cutoff time. Typically, voters submit these sorts of requests to the court if some unforeseen emergency — be it a natural disaster or a power outage — interrupts voting during scheduled hours.

Ohio State Sen. Bill Seitz (R) says the new bill would help cover the costs of keeping polls open later than normal. "Sadly, in both the November 2015 and March 2016 elections, rogue courts in Hamilton County issued orders extending polling hours," Seitz wrote in an op-ed this week. "These orders cost Hamilton County taxpayers $57,000, and forced the inside poll workers to stay around for an extra 60 to 90 minutes after already working a 14-hour day."

Those opposed to the bill argue the extensions weren't exactly requested without reason, however. In November 2015, a software glitch in newly installed systems caused some voters to be turned away without casting a ballot, while in March 2016, a car accident blocked off a main thoroughfare and left many voters stranded on the road during election day. "I think it's unconstitutional," Ohio State Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D) told Think Progress about the bond bill. "It's tantamount to a poll tax to require voters to post a cash bond, and we really need to have the ability to petition state or federal courts if there is some type of emergency necessitating the extension of polling hours."

The bill will next move to Ohio Gov. John Kasich's (R) desk, where he'll decide whether to sign it into law. Becca Stanek

10:50 a.m. ET
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Archaeologists working at the site of the ancient city of Stagira in Central Macedonia claim to have discovered the tomb of the great philosopher Aristotle, according to multiple reports by the Greek media. An official announcement is expected to be made by the team at the Aristotle 2400 Years World Congress.

"I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty," archaeologist Kostas Sismanidis told Sigmalive of the discovery.

Aristotle was born in Stagira in 384 BC and died in 322 BC in Chalcis, where many believed he was buried. However, two literary sources pointed archaeologists to Stagira, where Aristotle's ashes may have later been transferred.

The 2,400-year-old tomb stands in the middle of Stagira with 360-degree views:

The top of the dome is at 10 meters and there is a square floor surrounding a Byzantine tower. A semi-circle wall stands at two meters in height. A pathway leads to the tomb's entrance for those that wished to pay their respects. Other findings included ceramics from the royal pottery workshops and fifty coins dated to the time of Alexander the Great. [Greek Reporter]

The Byzantines later destroyed the tomb and constructed a tower in its place.

Aristotle was a student of Plato, and later tutored Alexander the Great. His work on the natural sciences and metaphysics as well as ethics, government, and the arts have a lasting impact to this day. Jeva Lange

10:38 a.m. ET
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Just hours after seemingly accepting Sen. Bernie Sanders' challenge for a debate, Donald Trump has already backed out, CBS News reports. On Thursday morning, Trump reportedly said he was just kidding when he agreed on Wednesday night's Jimmy Kimmel Live to face off against Sanders.

Trump initially seemed keen on the idea because "it would have such high ratings," and he figured Sanders "would be easier to beat" than Hillary Clinton. Sanders had already agreed to the debate, tweeting he "look[s] forward to debating Donald Trump in California before the June 7 primary." Becca Stanek

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