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April 21, 2014
CC by: Aero Icarus

There may be certain instances where it's worth the risk of dying to hitch a ride in the wheel well of a passenger jet — say, gunmen are after you — but taking a pleasure trip to Hawaii doesn't make the list. On Sunday, an unidentified 16-year-old jumped a fence at California's San Jose Mineta International Airport, climbed up the wheel well of a departing Hawaiian Airlines flight, and miraculously jumped out after the plane landed in Maui five and a half hours later. Maui airport officials spotted him and informed the FBI.

"How he survived I don't know," said the FBI's Honolulu spokesman Tom Simon. "It's a miracle." The boy, a runaway from Santa Clara, survived temperatures of minus 80 degrees and an oxygen-starved altitude of 38,000 feet. "I imagine he must have blacked out at about 10,000 feet," Simon added. "The air is pretty thin up there."

The teenager was turned over to the Hawaiian child welfare department, but not charged with any crimes. "Our primary concern now is the well-being of the boy, who is exceptionally lucky to have survived," said Hawaiian Airlines spokeswoman Alison Croyle. The FAA says that wheel-well stowaways are aided a bit by residual heat from hydraulic lines and wheels, but that the main mechanism for survival is your body shutting down as the plane gradually ascends and descends.

Still, people can and do die from riding in wheel wells. It seems a better idea to mow lawns or babysit until you have plane fare, right? Peter Weber

6:50 p.m. ET

Super Bowl 50 started off with a bang, as Lady Gaga sang a beautiful rendition of the National Anthem. In an earlier interview with the NFL Network, the pop star said performing at the Super Bowl was an "honor" and "a total dream come true." Catherine Garcia

6:37 p.m. ET
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Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos are facing off against Cam Newton and the Carolina Panthers in Super Bowl 50, and those who don't have access to a television can still watch every minute of the game during the livestream on CBSSports.com.

2:19 p.m. ET

Larry David and Bernie Sanders appeared alongside each other on Saturday Night Live, but the real highlight of the night didn't involve Sanders at all. In this pre-taped sketch, watch David play a cranky, neurotic Sanders in the cleverly titled "Bern Your Enthusiasm." Julie Kliegman

1:48 p.m. ET
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The United Nations Security Council condemned North Korea on Sunday for defying international warnings in launching a long-range rocket that many believe is a cover for a test of a ballistic missile that could reach the United States mainland.

All 15 Security Council members approved a statement at an emergency meeting emphasizing that using ballistic missile technology violates four resolutions, The Associated Press reports. The group also vowed to adopt a new resolution soon with "significant" sanctions for North Korea. Julie Kliegman

1:18 p.m. ET
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In a Monmouth University poll released Sunday, Donald Trump leads the Republican field with 30 percent of the support from likely New Hampshire primary voters. Marco Rubio and Jeb Bush are tied for 13 percent, with Ted Cruz notching 12 percent.

On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders leads Hillary Clinton, 52 percent to 42 percent.

The poll's margin of error is 4.4 percentage points. On Tuesday, New Hampshire will be the second state to vote in the primaries. Julie Kliegman

12:28 p.m. ET
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Bernie Sanders distanced himself Sunday from "Berniebros," a wide-ranging term that some have used to describe sexist supporters of the Vermont senator.

"It's disgusting," he said on CNN's State of the Union. "We don't want that crap. Anybody who is supporting me and doing sexist things, we don't want them. I don't want them. That's not what this campaign is about."

See more of Sanders' interview here. Julie Kliegman

11:45 a.m. ET

Saturday night's Republican presidential debate featured a lot of heated conflict — once all of the candidates finally made it out on stage. Watch The Washington Post break down just how delightfully awkward the whole introduction process was. Julie Kliegman

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