Noted
March 28, 2014

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has some bracing news about autism in America: According to its most recent data, 1 in 68 American 8-year-olds have some sort of autism spectrum disorder, a 30 percent rise from just two years earlier. When you look at just 8-year-old boys, that number rises to 1 in 42. In 2000, when the CDC started recording autism prevalence, an estimated 1 in 150 children were autistic. The new numbers, from 2010, are extrapolated from data from 11 states.

Nobody can say for sure why autism numbers are rising so fast — and this report doesn't even try — but the biggest factors probably have little to do with an increase in autism and more to do with earlier and better diagnosis, plus a shift in what we mean by autism. There's no common criteria for diagnosing autism spectrum disorders, which is one reason parts of New Jersey reported 1 in 45 kids with ASD and parts of Alabama recorded 1 in 175.

The biggest rise in autism diagnoses was among kids with average or above-average IQs — generally understood to be milder forms of the disorder. "Twenty years ago we thought of autism with intellectual disability," Johns Hopkins neurologist Dr. Gary Goldstein tells CNN. "We never looked at children who had normal intelligence." Here's a breakdown of the new data, from the CDC. --Peter Weber

Foreign affairs
9:16 a.m. ET
AP Photo/Hani Mohammed, File

A new report from the United Nations on Friday says at least 120,000 people have been displaced due to ongoing violence in Yemen (an Oxfam report put the minimum number closer to 121,000).

"This is in addition to the 300,000-plus Yemenis already displaced by previous violence," Adrian Edwards, a spokesperson for the UNHCR, said in a statement reported by NPR. "It's feared this figure could rise significantly if violence continues."

The number of displaced persons has escalated since Saudi-led airstrikes began against the Houthi rebels more than three weeks ago. Iran submitted a four-point peace plan to the U.N. on Friday, but Reuters reports that other international diplomats have dismissed the country's claims of brokering peace, saying Iran, which has backed the Houthi rebels in the conflict, is not a neutral party. Sarah Eberspacher

Watch this
8:41 a.m. ET

You can plan the perfect IMAX event to drum up interest for your teaser trailer, but sometimes (all of the time), the internet is going to ignore your carefully laid out plans.

Such was the case for Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice director Zack Snyder, who countered an online leak of the upcoming film's trailer by releasing the real deal on Friday night. As his tweet accurately claims, Warner Bros.' version is neither blurry nor pirated. Watch Ben Affleck's Batman and Henry Cavill's Superman square off, sans IMAX, in the video, below. —Sarah Eberspacher

ISIS
8:27 a.m. ET

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said that the Islamic State claimed its militants were behind a series of attacks on the city of Jalalabad that killed at least 33 people and injured more than 100 on Saturday.

"Today the deadly attack in Nangarhar Province, who claimed responsibility?” asked Ghani while speaking on national television. "Taliban did not claim responsibility, but Daesh claimed responsibility." The New York Times notes that Daesh is the Arabic pronunciation of ISIS.

Several explosions occurred near the New Kabul Bank branch, as government workers lined up to collect their paychecks. The deadliest attack involved a suicide bomber wearing a vest packed with explosives. Officials said all of the victims were civilians.

Al Jazeera English reports that if confirmed as an ISIS operation, Saturday's attacks would be the first major ones carried out by the group in Afghanistan. Sarah Eberspacher

This just in
April 17, 2015
Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the most prolific scorer in NBA history, underwent successful quadruple-bypass surgery in Los Angeles, according to a statement released Friday by UCLA Health. Abdul-Jabbar had the procedure done Thursday at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center after being admitted there with cardiovascular disease earlier this week.

Abdul-Jabbar is the NBA's all-time leading scorer and is most known for his 14 seasons with the Los Angeles Lakers during the "Showtime" era. In his 20 years in the NBA, Abdul-Jabbar won six championships and was named league MVP six times. He is expected to make a full recovery. Kimberly Alters

Only in America
April 17, 2015
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A San Diego man trying to board a bus in his wheelchair was stripped of his transit pass because he didn't have proper "proof" of his disability. A transit cop told Joey Canales, 31, that he wasn't carrying the proper paperwork and confiscated the pass. "My disability is not hidden," Canales told the officer, who also issued him a ticket. The Week Staff

2016 Watch
April 17, 2015
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

On Friday at 6 p.m., former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee will appear on Fox News' Special Report with Bret Baier, where he's expected to lay out details of his future announcement about whether he'll run for president. Baier has been interviewing potential candidates in his series The Presidential Contenders: 2016.

Speaking with reporters before heading to New Hampshire this weekend to join several fellow potential and confirmed GOP candidates, Huckabee was predictably cryptic. "I will at least give people an understanding of when there will be an announcement and where," he said.

In January, Huckabee ended his own show on Fox News to explore a second shot at the White House — he won the Iowa GOP caucuses in 2008. Earlier this week, he also stated his nationally broadcast radio show would end in May. Stephanie Talmadge

This just in
April 17, 2015
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The merger between Comcast and Time Warner, America's first- and second-largest cable providers, may not be so inevitable after all. The Department of Justice's antitrust lawyers are reportedly considering blocking the merger, sources told Bloomberg, for fear that "consumers would be harmed" by Comcast's $45.2 billion purchase of Time Warner Cable, which would create a nationwide cable giant. 

Officials at the FCC's antitrust division, who are also reviewing the deal, reportedly "aren't negotiating" with Comcast about ways to fix the deal to prevent it from falling apart.

In light of these details, Comcast issued a statement saying there is "no basis" for a federal lawsuit to stop the merger, and maintained that the acquisition would result in "significant consumer benefits," like faster internet speeds, better video quality, and cost savings. Meghan DeMaria

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