FOLLOW THE WEEK ON FACEBOOK
March 24, 2014

The new trailer for X-Men: Days of Future Past begins by assuring audiences that this is far bigger than your average X-Men sequel. "So many battles waged over the years," says Patrick Stewart's Professor X in the new trailer. "And yet, none of them like this. Are we destined to destroy each other? Or can we change who we are and unite? Is the future truly set?"

It's hard to argue with director Bryan Singer's ambitious vision. Days of Future Past uses a mind-bending time travel storyline to unite the casts from the original X-Men trilogy and the Cold War-era prequel First Class, resulting in a sprawling, star-studded superhero sequel. This new trailer offers glimpses at a number of intriguing elements, including new villain Bolivar Trask (Peter Dinklage), the terrifying Sentinels, and a fraught conversation between Professor X and his younger self (James McAvoy).

Will this massive X-Men story score with audiences? We'll find out when Days of Future Past hits theaters on May 23. --Scott Meslow

8:30 a.m. ET
Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump are separated by less than the 4.5 percent margin of error in a Washington Post/ABC News poll released Sunday morning. Clinton has maintained a substantial lead over Trump for most of the campaign, but the gap has increasingly narrowed as Election Day approaches, and this survey sees that trend continue.

Among likely voters Clinton scores 46 percent support to Trump's 44 percent, while Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson takes 5 percent and the Green Party's Jill Stein has 1 percent national support. If Johnson and Stein are removed as options, Clinton leads Trump 49 to 47 percent. Among registered voters, Clinton and Trump are tied at 46 percent in a two-way race and 41 percent in a four-way race.

More than 100 million people are expected to watch Monday's first general election debate between the two candidates, the largest debate audience in U.S. history. Bonnie Kristian

7:43 a.m. ET
Karen Ducey/Getty Images

A 20-year-old man named Arcan Cetin was arrested by police at 7 p.m. Pacific time Saturday evening on suspicion of the mass shooting a Macy's in a Washington State mall that took five lives Friday night. Cetin was unarmed and was described as quiet, even "zombie-like," at the time of his arrest.

Though originally described by police as Hispanic based on a blurry surveillance image, Cetin is a permanent resident of the United States from Turkey. At present, the Seattle branch of the FBI says there is no evidence this was an act of terrorism or that there were any other shooters.

Cetin was prohibited from owning a firearm after charges of domestic violence and drunk driving, but he was in compliance with court-ordered mental health counseling. His former girlfriend once worked at the department store where he attacked, but she no longer works there or lives in the area. Bonnie Kristian

September 24, 2016
Brian Blanco/Getty Images

One day after The New York Times published cell phone footage of the moments preceding Keith Lamont Scott's fatal shooting at the hands of police in Charlotte, North Carolina, Chief Kerr Putney of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department announced he would release footage from the dash and body cameras of the officers involved on Saturday. The graphic video is available here via the Charlotte Observer.

Putney said releasing the video would have "no adverse impact on the investigation" into Scott's death, adding that his decision was not influenced by five days of protesters in Charlotte calling for the film to be made public. North Carolina. Gov. Pat McCrory and the mayor of Charlotte both endorsed the decision.

The police chief also said the video has "no definitive, visual evidence" that Scott was armed at the time of his death — a major point of controversy between accounts from police and other eyewitnesses — but maintained other evidence says Scott "absolutely" had a gun when he was killed. Where the gun was located is less clear; an Associated Press report indicates Putney "told reporters on Saturday that officers saw marijuana and a weapon in Keith Lamont Scott's car," as opposed to in his hands.

This post has been updated throughout. Bonnie Kristian

September 24, 2016
Eric Feferberg/Getty Images

A new species of tropical ant has been discovered in the vomit of a diablito, or little devil frog, a very orange and poisonous frog that lives in Colombia and Ecuador.

Scientists use wild ant-eating frogs as tiny scouts who are able to search for insects in places people can't go. Then they capture the frogs and carefully make them vomit up the results of their latest explorations. The frogs are released unharmed.

In this case, the frog puke contained a single (and dead) member of the newly identified ant species, Lenomyrmex hoelldobleri. "Sometimes people think that our world is very well explored. Nothing could be farther from the truth," said Christian Rabeling of the University of Rochester, New York, who led a study on the new ant. He added, "The difficulty is finding the ants!" Bonnie Kristian

September 24, 2016
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A New York Times editorial published Saturday announced the paper's official endorsement of Democrat Hillary Clinton for president. The article did not offer a comparison of Clinton to her rival, Republican Donald Trump, instead promising to "explain in a subsequent editorial why we believe Mr. Trump to be the worst nominee put forward by a major party in modern American history."

As for Clinton, the editorial board insisted their rationale centered on her merits — "intellect, experience, toughness, and courage" — and not her position as the sole viable alternative to Trump: "The best case for Hillary Clinton cannot be, and is not, that she isn’t Donald Trump." Clinton should be seen as a realist rather than an opportunist, the endorsement essay argued, running through a record of her accomplishments while dismissing Clinton's negatives as "occasional missteps."

The Times endorsement of Clinton may be striking in its vehemence, but it is hardly unexpected, as the paper has endorsed the Democratic candidate in 22 of 26 presidential elections since 1916. The last time a Republican won the Times' loyalty was Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1956. Bonnie Kristian

September 24, 2016
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The CEOs of America's 100 largest corporations are universally uninterested in financially backing Republican Donald Trump, an analysis from The Wall Street Journal reveals. However, 11 Fortune 100 CEOs have donated to Democrat Hillary Clinton, a longtime Wall Street favorite.

Among Clinton's high-profile donors from the business world are the leaders of Apple, American Airlines, and Nike. Her Fortune 100 CEO support is double what President Obama received in 2012, when nearly a third of these 100 CEOs backed Republican Mitt Romney and 66 didn't donate to any presidential candidate.

Clinton has also received financial support in the form of donation bundling from social media executives, namely Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg. A bundler collects donations on the campaign's behalf and may be rewarded with special access or a position in the new administration should their candidate win. Bonnie Kristian

September 24, 2016
Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Republican nominee Donald Trump is a simplistic "moron," rock legend Bruce Springsteen said while speaking in an interview with Rolling Stone to promote his new autobiography.

"Well, you know, the republic is under siege by a moron, basically," he said in the conversation published Friday. "The whole thing is tragic. Without overstating it, it's a tragedy for our democracy." Springsteen went on to critique Trump's connection to "white nationalism and the alt-right movement" before offering a more empathetic analysis of why Trump's candidacy has garnered so much support:

"I believe that there's a price being paid for not addressing the real cost of the deindustrialization and globalization that has occurred in the United States for the past 35, 40 years and how it’s deeply affected people's lives and deeply hurt people to where they want someone who says they have a solution. And Trump's thing is simple answers to very complex problems. Fallacious answers to very complex problems. And that can be very appealing." [Springsteen, via Rolling Stone]

Fellow musician Jon Bon Jovi also took on Trump this week, telling Gigwise, a British music website, that it is "incredible" how Trump can "can lie to you. You tell him here's factually what you said that's incorrect and then he tells it the same [way again]." Bonnie Kristian

See More Speed Reads