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August 10, 2013

An anti-abortion activist eager to volunteer at a Washington, D.C., crisis pregnancy center was turned away for being an atheist. Sarah Terzo said the clinic's staff was initially welcoming, but rejected her help after learning of her atheism, saying they didn't have "non-Christians working here." Terzo says nine other anti-abortion organizations would not let atheists volunteer either. Samantha Rollins

8:16 a.m. ET

The Florida Gators bested the Wisconsin Badgers in a nail-biter 84-83 game of the NCAA basketball tournament's Sweet 16 round late Friday night.

After lagging behind Wisconsin for the first half of the game, the Gators pulled ahead for much of the second half. A concerted comeback by the Badgers produced a tied game with just four seconds left on the overtime clock when Wisconsin's Nigel Hayes scored two points. The game seemed finished — until Florida's Chris Chiozza sprinted down the court to make a running 3-pointer just as the buzzer rang out in Madison Square Garden.

Florida will next face South Carolina on Sunday. Bonnie Kristian

7:57 a.m. ET
Ahmad Gharabli/Getty Images

U.S.-supported Iraqi forces paused their fight to retake the Islamic State-occupied portion of the city of Mosul on Saturday in response to concerns about a high civilian casualty rate. "The recent high death toll among civilians inside the Old City forced us to halt operations to review our plans," said a representative of the Iraqi troops. "It's a time for weighing new offensive plans and tactics. No combat operations are to go on."

At least 200 people were reportedly killed in a single U.S. coalition airstrike in Mosul, news a United Nations official in Iraq condemned as a "terrible loss of life." The Iraqi Observatory for Human Rights counts an unconfirmed 700 civilian deaths attributable to coalition strikes and forces since the siege on the western half of the city began in mid-February.

A representative of the U.S. military said an investigation of the alleged casualties is underway, but cautioned the process "takes time ... especially when the date of the alleged strike is in question." Bonnie Kristian

March 24, 2017

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has declared Friday — the day House Republican leadership pulled the vote on the American Health Care Act — a "great day for our country." "It's a victory ... for the American people. For our seniors, for people with disabilities, for our children, for our veterans," Pelosi said in a press conference shortly after the House Republican leadership's announcement.

Other Democrats were just as gleeful. House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) similarly deemed Friday a "good day for the American people," while Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said he has "never seen an administration as incompetent as the one occupying the White House." "So much for the art of the deal," Schumer said, referring to President Trump's bestselling book.

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez borrowed the words of former Vice President Joe Biden to describe the moment:

Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) tweeted this sick burn:

Hillary Clinton also came out of the woods to celebrate, starting off with this tweet and continuing on with several more:

Trump on Friday blamed Democrats for Republicans' health-care bill's failure, deeming Pelosi and Schumer the real "losers" because now Democrats have to "own" ObamaCare, which he said is "exploding." Democrats were unfazed by that prospect: "We owned it yesterday and the day before and in November," Hoyer said. Becca Stanek

March 24, 2017

House Republican leadership pulled the American Health Care Act from the chamber floor Friday, after it became apparent it did not have the necessary party consensus to pass. The bill, which was drafted by House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and backed by President Trump, was Republicans' first attempt at realizing their nearly decade-long promise to repeal and replace ObamaCare.

While former President Barack Obama was in office, Republican lawmakers repeatedly passed bills calling for the repeal of his signature Affordable Care Act, only to have the Democratic president veto that legislation when it arrived on his desk. With the government currently 100 percent controlled by the GOP, some reporters asked after the bill failed Friday why Republicans had been able to pass countless measures under Obama, but not one under a Republican president who might actually sign their bills into law — and Texas Rep. Joe Barton (R) offered a shockingly frank answer:

In this case, "fantasy football" turned into "possibly leaving millions of Americans without health insurance." Kimberly Alters

March 24, 2017

President Trump declared Friday that the real reason the GOP plan to repeal and replace ObamaCare failed was because there were "no votes from the Democrats." "I think the losers are [House Minority Leader] Nancy Pelosi and [Senate Minority Leader] Chuck Schumer, because now they own ObamaCare. They own it, 100 percent own it," Trump said, shortly after the planned vote on the American Health Care Act was called off by House Republican leadership. Trump said he was "a little surprised" by the House Freedom Caucus' refusal to support the GOP-backed bill, but insisted they were still his "friends."

Though Trump claimed "a lot of people don't realize how good" the GOP's health-care proposal was, he maintained that Republican leaders' decision Friday to pull the vote was "perhaps the best thing that could happen." "The best thing politically speaking is to let ObamaCare explode," Trump said, predicting Democrats will eventually "come to us."

Watch Trump's remarks below. Becca Stanek

March 24, 2017

At a press conference Friday after GOP leadership canceled the vote on the American Health Care Act, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) admitted "doing big things is hard." "Moving from an opposition party to a governing party comes with growing pains," Ryan said. "Well, we're feeling those pains today."

Though Ryan conceded the House Freedom Caucus contributed to the GOP being short on votes, he laid the blame on the Republican Party as a whole. He noted the party will "need time to reflect" and consider what could've been done better.

Ryan said Republicans "came really close" but ultimately "came up short," explaining why he advised President Trump earlier Friday that "the best thing to do" would be to pull the bill. "ObamaCare is the law of the land," Ryan said. "It's going to remain the law of the land until it's replaced."

After a seven-year battle to repeal and replace ObamaCare, Ryan confirmed the GOP will be "moving on" for now from health care to tax reform. Catch a snippet of Ryan's comments below. Becca Stanek

March 24, 2017

House Democrats had the perfect GIF picked out and ready to go when House Republicans pulled the vote on the American Health Care Act on Friday afternoon. Within minutes of the announcement, the official account tweeted this out:

Sometimes, a picture really is worth a thousand words. Becca Stanek

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