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January 16, 2013

Verizon claims to have caught an employee — "Bob" — outsourcing his daily coding duties to China so he could spend his time browsing Reddit, watching cat videos, and surfing eBay. Bob's bosses were tipped off when VPN logs showed Bob's log-in details being input from Shenyang, China. Apparently, Bob — who regularly received "excellent" performance reviews — pulled this scam on multiple companies at the same time. He was reportedly raking in a couple hundred thousand dollars annually. PDF invoices discovered on his computer reportedly show that he paid the Chinese firm $50,000 a year. Chris Gayomali

2:07 a.m. ET
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When New York Police Department Officer Yadarquiris Molina began working in the 42nd Precinct, she wasn't the only person on the squad with that last name, as Officer Jasmine Molina had just transferred over from the 41st.

Neither woman thought much of it until they began talking in the locker room in 2014, and discovered that they had more than a last name in common — they had the same father. "When she told me his name — which is the exact same as mine — I stood speechless," Jasmine told NBC New York. "I didn't have anything to say."

Yadarquiris recalled that when she was a child, her father brought Jasmine, who is younger, to visit her, but they never saw each other after that. Jasmine found out that she has another sister and two brothers, and when their father was dying, all of them were at his bedside. The sisters have been spending a lot of time together to make up for the years they were apart, and say they're not upset that it took so long to be reunited. "The relationship that we have now is what matters at this point," Yadarquiris said. Catherine Garcia

1:36 a.m. ET
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With quips like this, it's almost as if Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) got his degree from the Mike Huckabee School of Joke-Telling.

On Thursday, Talking Points Memo reporter Alice Ollstein tweeted that she had asked Roberts if he supported getting rid of "essential health benefits" as part of the American Health Care Act, the Republicans' proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act. His response? "I wouldn't want to lose my mammograms."

Roberts quickly became a prime example of a boob that doesn't need a mammogram. People immediately started calling him out, including Rep. Judy Chu (D-Calif.), who tweeted: "Cancer is no joke. Mammograms save lives. Same reason we pay for prostate exams. Government shouldn't decide what care women can access." Roberts did tweet an apology, saying he "deeply" regretted his comments "on a very important topic. Mammograms are essential to women's health, and I never intended to indicate otherwise." Catherine Garcia

1:19 a.m. ET

Somebody, at some point, must have told former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee that he was funny. Maybe they were right, Jimmy Kimmel said on Thursday's Kimmel Live. Huckabee writes daily topical jokes on Twitter, "but like a lot of great comedy voices, not everyone 'gets it,'" Kimmel said. "Some people have been posting tweets criticizing his joke-writing," drawing this retort from Huckabee:

"Maybe he's right, maybe these jokes are over our heads," Kimmel said. "Maybe what Mike Huckabee needs is a stronger presentation — jokes don't always have the same punch when you read them to yourself." He turned the show over to comedian Patton Oswalt who, maybe, did his best with the material he was handed. Watch below. Peter Weber

12:43 a.m. ET
Molly Riley-Pool/Getty Images

On Thursday, Fortune released its fourth annual list of the world's 50 greatest leaders, and there's one name glaringly absent from the list. Theo Epstein, whose Chicago Cubs broke their 108-year curse in November, tops the ranks of the greatest global leaders in business, government, philanthropy, and the arts, followed by Alibaba founder Jack Ma, Pope Francis, Melinda Gates, and Jeff Bezos, the Amazon chief and owner of The Washington Post. Not making the Top 50 is President Trump.

Trump's second national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, made the cut, coming in at No. 7 with this question: "What will happen if and when his adamantly independent thinking conflicts with his duty of loyalty to the president"? Also in the Top 50: Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), one of Trump's top Republican critics (No. 9); German Chancellor Angela Merkel, the Western hemisphere's anti-Trump (No. 10); Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio), one of Trump's last GOP primary rivals (No. 12); and a chorus of other people who famously don't see eye-to-eye with Trump, including Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (No. 31), comedian Samantha Bee (No. 19), and LeBron James (No. 11).

So how did the nominal leader of the free world not make the cut? "Remember as you scan our list that we evaluate each leader within his or her own field of endeavor," Fortune's Geoff Colvin says in his introduction. He began his introduction on the glaring visibility of "tarnished leaders" today, mentioning ousted Trump National Security Adviser Michael Flynn and Trump himself, whose "approval ratings are lower than those of any new president for whom such polling exists."

Colvin also listed the three characteristic that great leaders must promote, including that they "acknowledge reality and offer hope," and "build bridges." "As the acerbity of political discourse threatens to infect the whole culture," he writes, "the best leaders stay refreshingly open to other views, engaging opponents constructively rather than waging war." Well, there's always the new Forbes Billionaires List, where Trump at least made the Top 554. Peter Weber

March 23, 2017

Considering the grief and political attacks congressional Democrats have weathered over ObamaCare from their Republican colleagues for seven years, perhaps a little schadenfreude is to be expected now that Republicans are rushing headlong into the health-care buzzsaw. The Democrats on the House Ways and Means Committee seem to have taken the lead in rubbing it in on Thursday.

They started with a dig at the GOP disarray, using the old throwback Thursday hashtag to remind Republicans of the "UNITY" they had all the way back in November:

Then there was the alternative acrostic for American Health Care Act:

And what internet trolling session would be complete without animated GIFs?

The House Republicans wanted to repeal ObamaCare on the seventh anniversary of it being signed into law, and failed, even after trying to borrow tactics they ascribed to the Democrats. They may push through the latest version of the ACHA on Friday. But on Thursday, a little mockery seems fair. Peter Weber

March 23, 2017
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In public, President Trump is having a great time pretending to drive big rigs and wearing pins that read "I Heart Trucks," but behind the scenes, he is seriously regretting throwing his support behind House Speaker Paul Ryan's health-care plan, The New York Times reports.

Four people close to the president told The Times he now wishes he had pushed through tax cuts first, which would have pleased Republicans, rather than focus on the deeply unpopular health-care overhaul. Stephen Bannon, Trump's chief strategist, and Gary Cohn, the director of the National Economic Council, are both in agreement with him, and Trump gave his budget director, Mick Mulvaney, a message that he delivered Thursday night to GOP leaders: Hold a vote on the health-care bill Friday, and if it fails, Trump is moving on.

The Times' Glenn Thrush and Maggie Haberman spoke with more than a dozen aides and allies of Trump, and they said he's spent the last week jittery and impatient. He's someone who cares more about winning than dealing with policy details, the people close to him explained, and he prides himself on making deals, sometimes at the last minute, which is why he's struggling with negotiating with moderate Republicans who think the health-care bill is too harsh and conservatives who think it doesn't go far enough. Jared Kushner, his son-in-law and senior adviser, has said for days he thinks it was a mistake for Trump to support the bill, and senior Republicans told The Times that Vice President Mike Pence suggested Trump keep his distance from the proposal, making sure to remind people that it was all Ryan's idea. Read more about Trump's self-doubt at The New York Times. Catherine Garcia

March 23, 2017
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There will not be a score from the Congressional Budget Office released before Friday's vote on the latest version of the Republicans' health-care bill, Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas), chair of the House Ways and Means Committee, told reporters Thursday night.

Some of the changes to the original bill include the removal of items listed as essential health benefits under ObamaCare, like prescription drug coverage, doctors' services, pregnancy and childbirth, mental health services, and inpatient and outpatient hospital care. The CBO's original report estimated that the American Health Care Act would leave 52 million Americans uninsured by 2026 and reduce deficits by $337 billion over 10 years; on Thursday, an updated report was released, stating that the number of uninsured would remain the same, but the deficit would only be reduced by $150 billion. The vote was postponed on Thursday just hours before it was set to take place, as GOP leadership struggled to get more conservative and moderate Republicans to vote yes on the bill. Catherine Garcia

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