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November 27, 2012

Singapore's Marine Life Park officially earned the title of world's largest aquarium when it opened on November 25. The aquarium, with a record-setting viewing area that measures a whopping 108 feet long and 25 feet high, houses more than 100,000 marine animals of more than 800 different species. The Week Staff

3:12 p.m. ET
Phil Walter/Getty Images

So, you wanna be startin' a musical? Just look to Michael Jackson for inspiration.

A biographical musical about the pop legend, developed by Jackson's estate and production company Columbia Live Stage, is set to hit Broadway in 2020, Playbill reports. The show will feature Jackson's own songs to tell the story of his life.

This may be a P.Y.M. (Pretty Young Musical), but Lynn Nottage, the double-Pulitzer-winning playwright for Ruined and Sweat, is already slated to write it. Christopher Wheeldon, a Tony winner for choreographing An American in Paris, will choreograph and direct, per Variety.

The unnamed show moonwalks in the footsteps of jukebox musicals like Jersey Boys and Beautiful:The Carole King Musical, where musicians' songs describe their careers. And they all relay one piece of advice: Don't stop 'til you get a musical. Kathryn Krawczyk

3:11 p.m. ET
iStock.

Fewer Americans are smoking than ever before, Time reported Tuesday. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics put the number of adult smokers in the year 2017 at about 14 percent of the population, over 30 million people nationwide. The figure was around 16 percent in 2016, and 20 percent back in 2007.

This trend points to "a general decline" in the smoking population, NBC News reported. "Everything is pointed in the right direction," said Dr. K. Michael Cummings, an addiction researcher at the Medical University of South Carolina, who also noted that sales of cigarettes have fallen in recent years.

But additional data shows that electronic cigarettes may account for some of the declining figures, Time explained. Recent data shows that about 3 percent of U.S. adults used e-cigarettes in 2016. Although e-cigarettes don't contain the same harmful byproducts as cigarettes, the long-term effects of vaping aren't well-known.

Read more about the CDC data at Time. Shivani Ishwar

2:36 p.m. ET
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Department of Homeland Security received hundreds of complaints about civil rights violations last year that it did not investigate, Motherboard reported Tuesday.

Official records show that there were thousands of reports of detainees, prisoners, and suspects who suffered civil rights abuses in 2017, but because of "limited investigative resources," several hundred were left untouched. The complaints across all DHS agencies, including Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Transportation Security Administration, and the Coast Guard, alleged sexual and physical abuse as well as discrimination and general mistreatment.

"The number of complaints that apparently went uninvestigated is quite surprising and it demands a closer look," Steven Aftergood from the Project on Government Secrecy at the Federation of American Scientists told Motherboard.

The DHS's watchdog office marked hundreds of cases as "closed not converted," which means that they were not fully investigated before being considered a closed case. In other cases, allegations against DHS employees were called "unsubstantiated." A DHS representative told Motherboard that the agency focuses much of its investigative efforts on cases that allege "corruption or criminal misconduct on the part of DHS employees or contractors, misconduct by high-level DHS employees, [or] use of force by DHS law enforcement officers," so it is "unable to investigate" many of the civil rights-related cases. Read more at Motherboard. Summer Meza

2:27 p.m. ET

President Trump oh-by-the-wayed Canada on Tuesday, switching gears while addressing the National Federation of Independent Businesses from ranting about the U.S.-Mexico border to bashing America's northern neighbors over their love of footwear. "By the way, Canada? They like to talk," Trump said. "They're our great neighbor, they fought World War II with us, we appreciate it. They fought World War I with us, we appreciate it."

But it is no longer 1945, Trump noted, going on to describe "people living in Canada coming into the United States and smuggling things back into Canada because the tariffs are so massive." Canadians, Trump said "buy shoes and they wear them. They scuff them up, they make them sound old or look old. No — we're cheated horribly."

It is not clear what Trump is referring to — as many have pointed out, it isn't illegal to buy shoes in the United States — but he has made one thing certain: These shoe-loving Canadians must be stopped. Watch his remarks below. Jeva Lange

1:06 p.m. ET

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) announced Tuesday that he would refuse to deploy any National Guard members to aid in border control efforts until President Trump's administration ends its practice of separating immigrant children from their parents.

"I ordered our four crewmembers and helicopter to immediately return from where they were stationed in New Mexico," said Hogan on Twitter. The federal government called for an increased National Guard presence in April to assist in Customs and Border Protection efforts, requesting around 4,000 troops to be sent to border states.

Hogan joined Massachusets Gov. Charlie Baker (R), who also said Monday that his state would no longer send troops to aid the federal effort. Protesting "the inhumane treatment of children," Baker rescinded his offer of equipment and personnel.

Democratic governors have also vowed not to help the Trump administration, reports The Washington Post. Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (D) said that she hadn't received a request for troops, but she promised that she would certainly refuse any future request. "Children should be with their families, not trapped in cages, sobbing and calling out for their parents," said Raimondo. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said the same. Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) banned the state from sending any troops, equipment, or money that would help enforce the policy of separating immigrant families, and Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy (D) denounced the administration while pledging not to use military efforts to condone the "inhumane practice." Summer Meza

12:59 p.m. ET

The Trump administration's policy of separating immigrant parents from their children at the border has been widely criticized by Republicans and Democrats alike, but several Fox News hosts have doubled down on defending the practice.

Speaking Tuesday morning on Fox News, Fox Business Network host Trish Regan said that the government "[needs] to create the right kind of incentives. Right now the incentive is sure, come here." Regan claimed that "if [immigrants] know they run the risk of being separated from their child for an indefinite amount of time, maybe they rethink that." She described it as "maybe a kind of tough love environment, where the U.S. government is saying, you know what? You do something illegally and you're not going to be rewarded for it."

The separation policy has been condemned as "child abuse" by the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Watch Regan's defense below. Jeva Lange

11:59 a.m. ET
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The World Health Organization's international list of diseases is getting an update.

In its revised International Classification of Diseases released Monday, the WHO removed transgender identity as a mental health disorder and added gaming disorder to the list. Recategorizing transgender as a sexual health condition is aimed at cutting stigma and improving quality of care, says the WHO.

The WHO first considered declassifying "gender incongruence" in July 2016, The New York Times reports, but didn't make the change officially until the Monday release of the ICD-11, the WHO's first revision to its list of diseases in 28 years. Over the past few decades, transgender identity has hopped from a "sexual deviation" to "gender dysphoria" in the DSM mental disorder handbook used by psychologists. Now, it's only considered a disorder, per 2013's DSM-5, if a transgender person experiences distress or dysfunction.

Gaming disorder, characterized as an addiction to gaming, also made the WHO's new list. A version called internet gaming disorder first appeared in the DSM-5.

The ICD-11 goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2022, so health professionals can use the next few years to get ready for the switch. But the world isn't required to and probably won't adopt the new classifications immediately, says the WHO. Some countries are still stuck on the eighth and ninth editions of the ICD, and the U.S. didn't switch to the ICD-10 until 2015. Kathryn Krawczyk

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