Stats of our lives
January 9, 2012

50.3
Percent of 2011 music sales that came from digital downloads — the first time digital beat CDs, according to Nielsen/Billboard

8.5
Percent increase in digital music sales, to 1.27 billion tracks

5
Percent drop in physical CD sales, to 228 million albums

Source: TIME The Week Staff

Discoveries
1:30 p.m. ET
Frances M. Ginter/Getty Images

Scientists have discovered a saltwater network 1,000 feet below an ice-free region in Antarctica, and its implications are, literally, out of this world.

If life-supporting aquifers can exist in Antarctica, there's a good possibility that they could exist on Mars, too. Antarctica is the region of Earth most similar to Mars, and the McMurdo Dry Valleys, where the saltwater was found, are some of Earth's coldest, driest environments, The Verge explains.

The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, explains that the find is significant, because the saltwater was found at a temperature that could support microbial life. The Dartmouth researchers used an electromagnetic sensor to find Antarctica's saltwater brines, and they found that beneath frozen surfaces, Antarctica has a system of interconnected, unfrozen aquifers. They believe the saltwater aquifers could be the byproducts of ancient ocean deposits or an evaporated lake.

While researchers believe Mars' surface is too cold to for anything to live there, it's possible that its subsurface could sustain life, especially if Antarctica's subsurface could do so. The team plans to study larger areas of Antarctica to see if other regions could also be home to saltwater networks. Meghan DeMaria

This just in
1:28 p.m. ET
(Alex Goodlett/Getty Images)

The NFL is ditching its controversial tax-exempt status because it has become a "distraction," NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced Tuesday in a letter to team owners. Many questioned the NFL's unique exemption last year amid the league's domestic violence debacle, and some lawmakers began pushing to end the benefit, which Congress created in 1966 to smooth the merger of the NFL and AFL. Though the change is expected to have little impact on the NFL's bottom line, it should mitigate some criticism of the organization and its roughly $10 billion in annual revenue. Jon Terbush

Baltimore
1:15 p.m. ET

With Baltimore engulfed in violence and looting last night, a Baltimore city councilman, Nick Mosby, tried to explain the roots of the rioters' anger to a Fox News interviewer, explaining that people were showing "decades-old anger and frustration for a system that's failed them."

"This is bigger than Freddie Gray," he said, whose death sparked the riots. "This is about the socioeconomics of poor urban America." He added, "When folks are undereducated, unfortunately they don't have the same intellectual voice to express it the way other people do."

The interviewer, Leland Vittert, then asked, "We just watched this liquor store being looted... Is that right?" To which Mosby responded, "Is that right? No. I think you've missed everything I've tried to articulate."

Watch some of the exchange below, and watch a full exchange here, in which Mosby signs off by saying Vittert's continued concern with the liquor store was "not productive." —Ryu Spaeth

"This can erupt anywhere in socially economically deprived America."Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby speaks to FNC's Leland Vittert as rioting continues.

Posted by Fox News on Monday, April 27, 2015

Baltimore
1:08 p.m. ET
Pool/Getty Images

President Obama on Tuesday said there was "no excuse" for Monday's violence and destruction in Baltimore following the funeral for Freddie Gray, the black man who died in police custody of an unexplained spinal injury.

"They're not protesting, they're not making statement — they're stealing," Obama said.

"It's a handful of people taking advantage of the situation for their own purposes, and they need to be treated as criminal," he added.

Obama also lambasted rioters for having "distracted" from the peaceful, positive message preached by protesters in the preceding days. And broadening his focus to the recent spate of police killings of unarmed black men, Obama said it raised "troubling questions" and exposed deep-seated problems regarding police interactions with the communities they serve.

"There are some police who aren't doing the right thing," Obama said. Jon Terbush

military matters
12:23 p.m. ET
Scott Olson/Getty Images

While the U.S. Army for years urged recruits to "be all you can be," that message didn't quite get through to the military's health care system. In fact, military members who are misdiagnosed or otherwise hurt by treatment in a military medical facility lack accountability measures available in the civilian world to address the situation, resulting in substandard treatment and a general lack of transparency.

Lawsuits are not an option; mandated safety inspections are often skipped when a patient dies, and complaints filed against health care workers are stored in an internal database with little action taken.

Leaving the military's care is often not a viable choice, either: Service members are "unable, without specific approval, to get care elsewhere if they fear theirs is substandard or dangerous," wrote Sharon LaFraniere at The New York Times. "Yet if they are harmed or die, they or their survivors have no legal right to challenge their care and seek answers by filing malpractice suits." Bonnie Kristian

Baltimore
12:10 p.m. ET
Screenshot/The Baltimore Sun

As the riots in Baltimore raged on Monday, police officers were alerted to a "credible threat" of disparate gang members collaborating to attack law enforcement. But in a video by The Baltimore Sun, two members of rival gangs embraced and called the claim false.

"We don't want nobody to get hurt," said Crips gang member Charles Shelley, while embracing a member of the Bloods gang. "All that about the police getting hurt about certain gangs — that's false. We're not here for that. We're here to protect our community and that's it." Watch the whole video over at The Baltimore Sun. Kimberly Alters

Quotables
12:03 p.m. ET

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, a contender for the GOP nomination for president, offered his take on the Baltimore riots on Laura Ingraham's show this morning, saying a "lack of fathers" and a "lack of a moral code in our society" were responsible for the "thievery and thuggery."

"I came through the train on Baltimore last night, I'm glad the train didn't stop," he added.

Listen to his comments in full below, via Media Matters: —Ryu Spaeth

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