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August 19, 2016
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Paul Manafort, Donald Trump's campaign chairman, made a fortune and revived his political consultant career in Ukraine beginning with a 2005 contract with steel magnate Rinat Akhmetov, The Washington Post details, but Manafort's subsequent work for Ukraine's ruling party and since-ousted Moscow-aligned president, Viktor Yanukovych, might send him to jail, according to newly uncovered documents and emails.

The most serious legal problem for Manafort is that he and his Trump campaign deputy, Rick Gates, did not register as foreign agents for their covert work directly running a lobbying operation in Washington on behalf of Ukraine's government, The Associated Press reports, citing emails it has obtained. The emails show Gates' direct management of a lobbying effort via two lobbying firms, Mercury and the Podesta Group (run by Tony Podesta, brother of Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta), and former employees at both firms say Manafort — Gates' boss at DMP International — personally oversaw the campaign and spoke with them on the phone.

Also on Thursday, Ukraine's National Anti-Corruption Bureau posted on Facebook 22 instances where Yanukovych's Party of Regions earmarked $12.7 million in "under the table" payments to Manafort, though there is no proof Manafort ever received that money. "Under the U.S. Foreign Agents Registration Act, people who lobby on behalf of foreign political leaders or political parties must provide detailed reports about their actions to the Justice Department," AP says. "A violation is a felony and can result in up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000."

Politically, AP adds, "Manafort and Gates' activities carry outsized importance, since they have steered Trump's campaign since April. The pair also played a formative role building out Trump's campaign operation after pushing out an early rival." Manafort's relationship with Konstantin Kilimnik, a protégé who rose from interpreter to head of Manafort's Ukraine office, is also under scrutiny, given Kilimnik's well-known background with Russia's military intelligence, as detailed by Politico. Kilimnik says he traveled to the U.S. and met with Manafort as recently as this past spring.

Manafort said earlier this week that he had not personally received "any such cash payments" from the Party of Regions (though Manafort's statement "left open the possibility that cash payments had been made to his firm or associates," The New York Times notes), and he and Gates have maintained that they did no work for Ukraine that required registering as foreign agents. Neither had anything to add to those statements on Thursday. You can read more about Manafort's business in Ukraine and ties to its pro-Russian political and business class at AP, The Washington Post, Politico, and The New York Times. Peter Weber

12:40 a.m. ET
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President Trump surprised White House officials Tuesday morning when he invoked one of Chief of Staff John Kelly's sons, Marine 1st Lt. Robert M. Kelly, who was killed in Afghanistan in 2010, The Washington Post reports. Trump was speaking on Fox News Radio, responding to criticism over his untrue comments Monday that former President Barack Obama never called the families of fallen troops, a comment he walked back when challenged, saying he was "told" Obama didn't call, and "all I can do is ask my generals."

"For the most part, to the best of my knowledge, I think I've called every family of somebody that's died, and it's the hardest call to make," Trump told Fox News Radio on Tuesday. "I mean, you could ask General Kelly, did he get a call from Obama? You could ask other people."

White House officials then anonymously told Fox News, NBC News, The Associated Press, and The Washington Post that Obama did not call Kelly, then a Marine general, upon the death of his son. Robert Kelly, 29, was married, and typically the president would call the widow, not the parents, of a fallen service member. Gen. Kelly, who has been very careful that his son's death not be politicized and reportedly recoils at any grieving family being used for political points, did attend a May 2011 breakfast Obama hosted for Gold Star families, and he sat at first lady Michelle Obama's table. Kelly, unusually and without explanation, did not attend a Trump news conference Tuesday afternoon.

About two dozen service members have died during Trump's presidency, and AP found at least a few whose widows or parents said they never got a call or letter from Trump, though they said the military and other White House officials were very warm. Trump called the families of the four solider killed in Niger on Tuesday, after 12 days of silence. Peter Weber

12:35 a.m. ET

Rep. Frederica Wilson (D-Fla.) is revealing more about the conversation President Trump had with the widow of La David Johnson Tuesday afternoon, saying he made Myeshia Johnson cry. Had an Army sergeant not been holding the phone, Wilson said, she would have grabbed it and "cursed him out."

Army Sgt. La David Johnson, 25, was killed in Niger during an ambush earlier this month, along with three other soldiers. Wilson knew Johnson through a mentorship program she runs, and was in a limo with his pregnant widow and other relatives when Trump called. The phone was put on speaker, so everyone in the limo could hear what was being said, she told CNN, and while speaking to Myeshia Johnson, Trump said her husband "knew what he signed up for, but I guess it still hurts." Wilson said the mood in the limo was already solemn, as the family had just been told they couldn't have an open casket at Johnson's funeral. That information gave Myeshia Johnson "all kinds of nightmares about how his body must look now, his face must look, and that is what the president of the United States says to her?" Wilson said.

Trump's remarks were "off the cuff," Wilson told The Washington Post, and he kept "saying the same thing over and over." Myeshia Johnson was "just crying," she added, and "the only thing she said when it was time to hang up was 'thank you' and 'goodbye.'" In his community, La David Johnson was "our hero," Wilson told CNN, and Trump's comments were "not something that you say to a grieving wife." The White House would not comment on the phone call, saying the conversation was private. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017

They rescued her, and on Sunday, Nala returned the favor.

Nala, a boxer dog, was walking with her owners in their Lancaster, California, neighborhood on Sunday, when she jumped in front of them, protecting Cole Lewis, 10, and his mother from a Mojave green rattlesnake. "She waited until we were safe," Cole told ABC Los Angeles. "She stood her ground. She didn't whimper or anything when she got bit."

The snake bit Nala on the nose, making her bleed. Cole's stepfather, Anthony Borquez, knew that the faster you get help for a poisonous bite, the greater the chance of survival, and Nala was rushed to the vet. Nala got there in time, and is expected to go home soon. "She saved my life, and I just want to hang out with her now because she's my hero," Cole said. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017

A Florida congresswoman is upset over a comment President Trump made to the widow of U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson, one of the four troops killed earlier this month when they were ambushed by Islamist militants in Niger.

Rep. Frederica Wilson (D) told Local 10 News that Trump called Myeshia Johnson on Tuesday afternoon and they spoke for about five minutes, with Trump at one point telling Johnson: "He knew what he signed up for ... but when it happens it hurts anyway." "Yes, he said it," Wilson said. "It's so insensitive. He should have not said that. He shouldn't have said it." Myeshia Johnson is pregnant and due in January, and has two other children with her late husband, a 6-year-old daughter and 2-year-old son. After the phone call with Trump, Myeshia Johnson, her family, and friends went to Miami International Airport to wait for the Delta flight to arrive carrying her husband's flag-covered casket.

La David Johnson, 25, was a Walmart employee before becoming a member of the 3rd Special Forces Group at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Details surrounding the ambush that killed him on Oct. 4 are still murky, but the troops reportedly did not have any air cover and were in unarmored trucks when the attack took place. Trump has come under fire for not saying anything about the deaths or the botched mission, and he tried to turn things around by erroneously telling reporters that former President Barack Obama didn't call the families of fallen troops; he later tried to backtrack, saying Obama "probably did sometimes" call and "maybe sometimes he didn't. I don't know. That's what I was told." Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017
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Philando Castile would often reach into his own pocket to pay for student lunches when the children didn't have enough money to cover the cost, and in remembrance of the nutrition services supervisor, a memorial fund has been set up that aims to wipe out all student lunch debt in Minnesota.

Philando Feeds the Children was set up by a local college professor, with the goal of raising $5,000 to take care of the lunch debt of children in the St. Paul area. By Tuesday night, $77,000 has been raised, and the goal has been increased to $100,000 to try to pay every debt in the state. In 2016, Castile was shot and killed by police officer Jeronimo Yanez in an incident that was captured on tape and sparked protests.

Castile worked at J.J. Hill Montessori School, and on Friday, his mother, Valerie, dropped off the first check to cover lunch debt. "This project means the world to me," she told the Star Tribune. Stacy Koppen, director of nutrition services at St. Paul Public Schools, said it costs on average $400 a year for one student's lunch, and Philando Feeds the Children will make it easier for parents who don't make a lot of money, but also don't qualify for free or reduced meals. "This fund really speaks to exactly who Philando Castile was as a passionate school nutrition leader," Koppen told NBC News. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017
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On Tuesday, less than a week after he was accused of sexually harassing a producer he worked with and suspended by the company, Amazon Studios head Roy Price resigned, the studio confirmed to USA Today.

The Man in the High Castle producer Isa Hackett says that in 2015, Price repeatedly harassed and propositioned her, and after she rebuffed his advances, she told Amazon about what was happening. Price's resignation comes after dozens of women accused powerful Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and assault. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017
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Former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer spent most of Monday being interviewed by members of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team, several people familiar with the meeting told Politico Tuesday.

One person with knowledge of the interview said Spicer was asked about President Trump's firing of former FBI Director James Comey, the statements he made about the firing, and Trump's meetings with Russian officials like Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. The interview was part of Mueller's investigation into Russia's potential meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

Spicer is a former Republican National Committee spokesman, and during the general election he was part of Trump's team working out of Trump Tower. Trump's former chief of staff, Reince Priebus, another RNC official who left to join the Trump administration, met with Mueller on Friday. Spicer declined to comment to Politico on the report. Catherine Garcia

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