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February 13, 2018
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A federal judge has blocked President Trump from ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, saying the administration's justification was not "legally adequate." Under DACA, which Barack Obama created via executive order, young undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children can apply for legal protections. The Trump administration announced in September that the program would expire on March 5. New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman sued to protect DACA, eventually resulting in today's ruling.

This isn't the first time a judge has blocked Trump on DACA. In January, a federal judge in California ordered the Trump administration to again start accepting DACA renewal applications. Tuesday's ruling goes farther, saying that the Trump administration must start processing new DACA applications.

The judge in Tuesday's ruling called Trump's DACA decision "arbitrary and capricious," and noted that while the administration had claimed that DACA's implementation by Obama was unconstitutional, Trump's tweets about revisiting DACA suggested that he thought the president was well within his right to use executive authority this way.

The Trump administration has yet to comment publicly on the ruling, which you can read in full here. Kelly O'Meara Morales

12:26 a.m. ET
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He's been fielding phone calls from people who want to know why he's leaving, but House chaplain Rev. Patrick J. Conroy says he has no idea why House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) asked him to resign earlier this month.

In an interview with The New York Times, Conroy said the message came from Ryan's chief of staff, and he was blindsided by the request. He notified Ryan in an April 15 letter that he was stepping down, at Ryan's request, on May 24. "I certainly wasn't given anything in writing," Conroy said. "Catholic members on both sides are furious." The nonpartisan House chaplain gives a prayer each day the House is in session, and Conroy has held the position since 2011.

Republicans and Democrats are preparing a letter asking Ryan for an explanation. Conroy told the Times that Ryan may have been motivated by his Nov. 6 opening prayer, as the GOP tax bill was being discussed: "May all members be mindful that the institutions and structures of our great nation guarantee the opportunities that have allowed some to achieve great success, while others continue to struggle. May their efforts these days guarantee that there are not winners and losers under new tax laws, but benefits balanced and shared by all Americans."

Conroy said a week later, a Ryan aide told him they were "upset" by the prayer and he was getting "too political," and Ryan later told him, "Padre, you've got to stay out of politics." Conroy doesn't see the problem. "If you are hospital chaplain, you are going to pray about health," he said. "If you are a chaplain of Congress, you are going to pray about what Congress is doing." Rep. Walter Jones (R-N.C.) told the Times he's "very upset" by Conroy's resignation, and "if this is true about the prayer, and we have freedom of religion in America, how about freedom of religion on the floor of the House? The members of the House vote for the chaplain. This is not a one-man decision." Catherine Garcia

12:13 a.m. ET

President Trump had a hard day, and naturally he "did what everyone does when they're feeling down, he called into a Fox News morning show — and it was, honestly, epic," Trevor Noah said on Thursday's Daily Show. "Normally, when Trump has a bad day, we know Trump watches Fox & Friends and yells at the TV, but today he did the same thing, but we all got to listen in." Trump started out by saying he was calling in because it was first lady Melania Trump's birthday, and when Brian Kilmeade asked what Trump got his wife, it didn't go so well.

"How did Trump mess up the world's easiest question?" Noah marveled. "I can't believe that Donald didn't get Melania anything for her birthday. Now, she might think he's not a very good husband. Also, I would pay anything to know what he wrote inside that card (that he definitely didn't actually get). Like, 'Roses are red, love is a mystery, I had a historic electoral college victory.'"

"So the interview didn't get off to a great start, but then it got worse," Noah said, playing some of the highlights. "I can safely say that I've never seen a news anchor try to bail on an interview with the president of the United States. Like, how is it that he's the commander in chief, but it's the couch people who have better things to do?"

Actually, "the interview started strong, but then the president started talking," Stephen Colbert said on The Late Show. And he also thought Trump's stated gift was lousy: "You're a billionaire! You got your wife a card? Do you know what she puts up with? I think she's earned a shopping spree — I'm going to say about $130,000 worth." Watch below. Peter Weber

April 26, 2018
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A former NBC News correspondent told The Washington Post that during the 1990s, former anchor Tom Brokaw made unwanted sexual advances toward her, once forcibly trying to kiss her after inviting himself into her hotel room.

Linda Vester, who was in her 20s at the time, tells the Post she did not file a complaint because she was worried about retribution. "I am speaking out now because NBC has failed to hire outside counsel to investigate a genuine, long-standing problem of sexual misconduct in the news division," she said. Another woman, a former production assistant who asked to remain anonymous, told the Post that Brokaw acted inappropriately with her in the 1990s, grabbing her hands and putting them under his jacket and against his chest.

Brokaw denied the allegations, telling the Post: "The meetings were brief, cordial, and appropriate, and despite Linda's allegations, I made no romantic overtures toward her, at that time or any other." Late last year, NBC fired Today co-host Matt Lauer after he was accused of sexual misconduct. The Post spoke with 12 female NBC staffers who said they were sexually harassed but never reported it; three said the harassment came from Lauer — one women said he exposed himself in his office, another said she had sex with him in his office in the middle of the day, and a third said he gave her a sex toy.

Three of Lauer's supporters told the Post that the relationships were consensual, and in a statement, Lauer acknowledged that he "acted inappropriately as a husband, father, and principal at NBC. However, I want to make it perfectly clear that any allegations or reports of coercive, aggressive, or abusive actions on my part, at any time, are absolutely false." For more on how NBC News has handled sexual misconduct allegations and the warning Ann Curry says NBC ignored, visit The Washington Post. Catherine Garcia

April 26, 2018

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met Friday in the demilitarized zone between their countries, and held hands as they crossed into South Korea.

When Kim crossed the demarcation line, he became the first North Korean leader to enter South Korea since the Korean War, and Moon was also invited to step over to the North Korea side. This is the first meeting of Korean leaders in more than a decade.

During their summit, meant to ease tensions between the Koreas, they are expected to discuss denuclearization and will plant a memorial tree in the border village of Panmunjom. They will also likely release a joint statement late Friday, which could touch on peace and the improvement of relations between the two countries. Because the Korean War ended in a truce and not a peace treaty in 1953, the countries are still considered to be at war. Catherine Garcia

April 26, 2018
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The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge welcomed their third child, a boy, on Monday, and while they've revealed his weight and the time he was born, they've remained mum about one very important detail: the little prince's name.

Not content with waiting for an official announcement, internet sleuths turned to the royal family's website for some clues. They found that most members of the family have their own pages, including Queen Elizabeth and Prince Harry, which follow the same pattern: royal.uk/their-name. On Prince George and Princess Charlotte's pages, it says "access denied," and that same message popped up when people tried to visit royal.uk/prince-albert. Type in other names, like prince-james and prince-arthur, and it merely says the page cannot be found.

Since this was discovered, the royal web developer made a change — now, royal.uk/prince-albert redirects to the website's home page. Albert is a name that runs in the royal family — there was Queen Victoria's husband, Prince Albert, and it was also King George VI's birth name and one of Prince Andrew and Prince Harry's middle names. Albert was rumored to be one of the names under consideration, with British bookmakers at one point having the odds at 5-1, so for those who thought the baby might be named Prince Brayden Jayden Kayden, sorry. Catherine Garcia

April 26, 2018
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Subway plans on closing about 500 locations in the United States, but will open more than 1,000 restaurants in Mexico, China, India, and the United Kingdom, CNBC reports.

The sandwich chain has more than 40,000 locations around the world, and counts Panera Bread and Chipotle as competitors. In 2017, Subway owners closed 800 restaurants, and a spokesman told CNBC that "looking out over the next decade, we anticipate having a slightly smaller but more profitable footprint in North America and a significantly larger footprint in the rest of the world."

Subways are owned by franchisees, and the company is working on a new loyalty program and a modern concept store featuring ordering kiosks and fresh menu items. Catherine Garcia

April 26, 2018
AP Photo/Eric Murinzi

More than two decades after the Rwandan genocide, four new mass graves have been found in Kigali Province, containing 2,000 to 3,000 bodies.

The first bodies were found Sunday, Rwanda's The New Times reports, and the excavation is ongoing. An old photo album was found in one of the graves, and relatives of people who have been missing since the genocide have flocked to the area, hoping to find out if their relatives are buried there.

More than 800,000 people, Tutsi and moderate Hutus, were murdered during the 1994 genocide. Survivors want to know why it took so long for the graves to be discovered, with one telling The Associated Press, "Those who participated in the killing of our relatives don't want to tell us where they buried them. How can you reconcile with such people?" Catherine Garcia

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