Why Republicans are really scared of Hillary Clinton

Newt Gingrich says nobody on the GOP bench will be able to compete with Hillary in 2016. What makes him think she's unstoppable?

A Hillary Clinton '16 campaign: Republicans' worst nightmare?
(Image credit: Morne de Klerk/Getty Images)

Hillary Clinton has famously and repeatedly insisted that she won't launch another bid for the White House in 2016. But she's more popular by a long shot than any other potential presidential hopeful, boasting 60 percent approval ratings. That, says Liz Marlantes at The Christian Science Monitor, is "higher than former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (39 percent), Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida (33 percent), Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin (47 percent), and Vice President Joe Biden (46 percent)." With those numbers, "would she be unbeatable?" Failed 2012 GOP candidate Newt Gingrich seems to think so. If Clinton runs, Gingrich told NBC's Meet the Press this week, she'll be "supported by Bill Clinton and presumably a still relatively popular President Barack Obama." Gingrich continued: "The Republican Party today is incapable of competing at that level." Well, Gingrich may be overstating things, says Marlantes:

Wow. We realize Gingrich has been rehabilitating himself as a Republican wise man of sorts — and for partisan pundits, provocative critiques of one's own party are always a great way to generate attention (we're writing about it, aren't we?). But to blithely write off the chances of the entire 2016 GOP field a full four years in advance is eyebrow-raising, even for a politician as prone to "grandiose" (as he once put it) statements as Gingrich.

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