What polyamory can teach us about the economics of family life

When you have economic stability and affluence, you’re freer to take risks — whether it’s pledging yourself to one person for life, or doing something more outre.

The face of 'poly.'
(Image credit: (Illustration by Lauren Hansen | Image courtesy iStock))

Polyamory seems to be having a moment, thanks in large part to the looser sexual mores of the millennial generation. But Kaitlyn Mitchell at Mic.com recently dinged the trend for largely being the province of well-off white people.

The funny thing is, stable traditional marriages in recent decades have also become a hallmark of the well-off. While we tend to think of marriage and polyamory as diametric opposites, the ability to engage in either form of relationship is a privilege — one that requires economic stability and a certain amount of affluence to access.

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