Hey, American businesses: Stop being so shamefully miserly with paid sick and family leave

We've run this experiment at the state level, and the benefits to businesses render the costs moot

President Obama wants paid sick and family leave for American workers. He made that abundantly clear in his State of the Union speech, and in a number of recent policy proposals.

The moral argument for these policies is almost too obvious to state. But the economic case is straightforward, too: If a person is faced with caring for a newborn or a sick elder or other family member, and paid leave isn't available, they have to weigh the importance of giving their family member their full attention against leaving their job, the loss of income and all the financial distress that entails, and the difficulties and uncertainties in eventually finding new employment. Meanwhile, employers must go through the time and expense of finding a new hire and training them for the role. Conversely, people who decide to stay at their jobs will likely be less productive, because they're trying to juggle their work with their suddenly more demanding obligations at home.

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