How to make sure the lessons of America's sexual misconduct reckoning really stick this time

Has America really learned its lesson on sexual misconduct? Don't be so sure ...

Anita Hill takes the oath for the Clarence Thomas hearings in 1991.
(Image credit: JENNIFER LAW/AFP/Getty Images)

In the fall of 1991, the Supreme Court nomination hearings of Clarence Thomas captivated America. Anita Hill, a subordinate to Thomas during his stints at the U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission, emerged during Thomas' nomination hearings to accuse him of sexual harassment during their time working together.

Thomas won confirmation anyway. He emerged embittered, decrying the "high-tech lynching" he'd been subjected to. Hill, meanwhile, was viciously smeared by the conservative establishment as "a little bit nutty and a little bit slutty."

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us