The Jussie Smollett case reveals the dangers of our confirmation bias

Most of us trust evidence that confirms our own beliefs. How can we better determine the truth?

Jussie Smollett.
(Image credit: Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Jonsson Cancer Center Foundation)

I've been silent on the topic of Jussie Smollett's alleged hate-driven assault for two reasons: First, because I wanted to believe him. Second, I also suspected he was lying.

Smollett, the Empire actor who said last month he'd been attacked in Chicago by a pair of men who beat him while shouting racist and homophobic slurs, on Wednesday was charged with a count of disorderly conduct for filing a false police report. His whole story appears to have been a fabrication.

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