Everyone is going to be disappointed by the Mueller report

It won't change a thing, but it'll make both sides look bad

President Trump, Adam Schiff, and Jerrold Nadler.
(Image credit: Illustrated | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images, imagoRB/iStock)

On Thursday, almost two years after the special counsel investigation headed by Robert Mueller was launched, the Department of Justice will publish Mueller's much-anticipated report — with redactions, of course, to protect classified material and raw grand-jury testimony. The report's publication promises an end to some of the divisions that engulfed the first half of Donald Trump's term as president and dominated the midterm elections.

At least, it promises an eventual end to them. At least for a few days, both parties will attempt to keep the fight alive by pumping hot takes into snippets of the report, hoping to salvage their own preferred narratives from the findings of the investigation. Does the report confirm that Mueller found enough malfeasance to impeach Trump? Does the report support Trump's total exoneration and make the original FBI counterintelligence probe look like a "witch hunt"?

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