3 things everyone is getting wrong about the El Paso-Dayton shootings

Mental illness is a red herring — but so is Trump

President Trump.
(Image credit: Illustrated | JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images, C-mere/iStock, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, FBI via AP, DickDuerrstein/iStock)

Mass shootings happen so regularly in America — and the stories of carnage when they do are so horrifying — that it's perfectly understandable that each new event would inspire demands for new laws and regulations based on instantaneous, impassioned analysis. The instinct to "do something" to stop the suffering and fear, and prevent yet another trauma, is very powerful. But that doesn't mean that these initial thoughts make a lot of sense.

Three ideas floated frequently in the days since the dual massacres in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, are especially ill-considered.

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