Captured

Life and death in the trenches

Never-before-published images show daily life for soldiers during World War I

Memorial Day

A century ago, World War I began.

Soon enough, the front lines became home to millions of soldiers from France, Germany, Russia, the U.S., and many other nations. For the next four years, soldiers slept, ate, bathed, prayed, and died on these front lines.

And now, thanks to a collection of never-before-seen photographs released by Reuters Pictures, we can witness those everyday actions as they unfold in muddy trenches, at camp sites, and across the dried out fields tragically peppered with freshly dug graves. Hundreds of glass plates were reportedly left behind by a viscount who was entrenched with the Armoured Cavalry Branch of the French Army at the time. That the specifics of the photographer and the dates go unknown make the bleak scenes all the more powerful.

On Memorial Day, as we remember our own fallen, and take a look back at the foreign troops who fought for their countries — and for their comrades in arms.

Recommended

European Union grants Ukraine candidate status
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.
the first step

European Union grants Ukraine candidate status

Latin America's leftward swing
Gustavo Petro
Briefing

Latin America's leftward swing

What's next for France?
Macron
Grayson Quay

What's next for France?

Aid workers say children in Somalia are dying of starvation 'before our eyes'
A mother in Mogadishu holds her malnourished baby.
humanitarian crisis

Aid workers say children in Somalia are dying of starvation 'before our eyes'

Most Popular

Thomas: Court should 'reconsider' rulings on contraceptives, same-sex marriage
Clarence Thomas
next to go?

Thomas: Court should 'reconsider' rulings on contraceptives, same-sex marriage

Fake Trump electors scheme ensnares Sen. Ron Johnson, several fake electors
Ron Johnson
'some staff intern'

Fake Trump electors scheme ensnares Sen. Ron Johnson, several fake electors

Is America abandoning religion — or just remixing it?
The Sistine Chapel.
Briefing

Is America abandoning religion — or just remixing it?