Southern Oregon is bracing for a tense anti-government 'standoff' over irrigation water

Oregon just had its driest April in 80 years, and rainfall during the typically wet months of March and April was the lowest since 1924, The Associated Press reports. The acute drought led the federal Bureau of Reclamation to announce last month that it won't release any water from Upper Klamath Lake in Southern Oregon, leaving tribes, wildlife, and farmers in the 240,000-acre Klamath Project irrigation zone high and dry.

The native tribes, which have first rights to the water under a long-fought 2013 court ruling, are upset about a drought-related parasite that's decimating the salmon they rely on, The Oregonian reports. And some of the farmers in the Klamath Project are up in arms — specifically, Grant Knoll and Dan Nielsen, who are promising a "standoff" with the federal government.

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