Lock him up? The risks and rewards of prosecuting Trump over Jan. 6

The sharpest opinions on the debate from around the web

Donald Trump.
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The House Jan. 6 committee is publicly laying out a case that former President Donald Trump broke multiple laws as he tried to overturn his 2020 loss in the presidential election, but the only person who can ultimately decide to prosecute him is Attorney General Merrick Garland. Garland said Monday that he is "watching," and "can assure you that the January 6 prosecutors are watching all of the hearings as well."

No president has ever been indicted during or after his term, though Richard Nixon would have been if he hadn't resigned and been pardoned by his successor, Gerald Ford. Jan. 6 committee members say they have uncovered enough evidence to charge Trump with several federal crimes, but indicting the former president would have its own risks in this hyper-polarized era. Should Garland try to lock Trump up?

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