Archaeologists find evidence of 9,000-year-old rituals on 'witchcraft' island

The island of Bla Jungfrun
(Image credit: Instagram/arwearwe)

A spooky Swedish island has revealed evidence of 9,000-year-old cave rituals to a team of archaeologists who are studying the isle's surprisingly active Mesolithic history, LiveScience reports. Blå Jungfrun, which lies off the east coast of Sweden, has been believed for countless centuries to be a site where witches gather every Easter to worship the devil; additional stories claim that taking a rock from the island curses the thief to a lifetime of bad luck. The island's appearance fits the part: Blå Jungfrun's "huge boulders and steep cliffs provide a dramatic landscape, and for centuries the uninhabited island has been associated with supernatural powers," one team of archaeologists said.

#blåjungfrunA photo posted by Kjell Arwe Ryden (@arwearwe) on Jul 27, 2015 at 9:12am PDT

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us