October 23, 2017

President Trump may prefer war heroes who were not captured, as he infamously said of Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) in 2015, but McCain apparently prefers presidents who did not avoid serving in Vietnam because of bone spurs — a condition Trump says kept him out of the war after his college deferments ran out. In a C-SPAN interview about the Vietnam War broadcast Sunday night, McCain talked about the strategic failings of Vietnam and the social upheaval it unleashed in the U.S., then pointedly criticized economic disparities in the draft:

One aspect of the conflict, by the way, that I will never ever countenance is that we drafted the lowest-income level of America, and the highest-income level found a doctor that would say that they had a bone spur. That is wrong. That is wrong. If we are going to ask every American to serve, every American should serve. [McCain, on C-SPAN]

McCain did not mention Trump by name. And "plenty of wealthy Americans avoided being drafted into Vietnam," with bone spurs "a somewhat common reason for such deferments," Aaron Blake notes at The Washington Post. "But it would be a pretty big coincidence for McCain to bring up that particular ailment — especially in light of his regular criticisms of Trump and his clear allusion to Trump's 'half-baked spurious nationalism' in a speech two days before taping this interview."

That speech, delivered Monday night, was actually aimed more at Stephen Bannon than Trump, McCain's coauthor Mark Salter tells The New York Times. But Trump took it personally, responding in a radio interview: "People have to be careful, because at some point, I fight back. ... I'm being very, very nice. But at some point, I fight back, and it won't be pretty." McCain laughed that off, telling reporters, "I have faced tougher adversaries." Peter Weber

10:24 p.m.

A woman suspected of sending a letter last week to the White House containing the poison ricin was arrested on Sunday at the New York-Canada border, law enforcement officials told CNN and The Associated Press.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers took the woman into custody at the Peace Bridge border crossing near Buffalo. One official told CNN the woman was carrying a gun when she was arrested. She is expected to face federal charges.

The letter, which appeared to have originated in Canada, was intercepted at an offsite facility that screens mail sent to the White House, AP reports. During a preliminary investigation, the envelope tested positive for ricin. Catherine Garcia

10:08 p.m.

Who watches the Watchmen? Emmy voters, clearly.

HBO's Watchmen on Sunday took home the award for Outstanding Limited Series at the Emmys, beating out shows including Mrs. America and Little Fires Everywhere. The superhero series, which is adapted from the graphic novel, was one of the most critically acclaimed shows of 2019, and it received the most nominations of any series at this year's Emmys with 26.

In an acceptance speech for Outstanding Limited Series, Watchmen creator Damon Lindelof dedicated the award to the victims of the Tulsa race massacre, which was depicted in the series. Watchmen star Regina King had earlier in the night won the Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie, while Yahya Abdul-Mateen II took the Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Emmy. The show also won a writing prize.

Watchmen examines systemic racism in the United States and was widely seen as having taken on even greater relevance in light of the nationwide protests over the killing of George Floyd. King touched upon that idea as she accepted her Emmy, saying, "Gotta vote. I would be remiss not to mention that being a part of a show as prescient as Watchmen." Brendan Morrow

9:42 p.m.

The Bobcat fire in Los Angeles County has grown to nearly 100,000 acres, and continues to threaten the historical Mt. Wilson Observatory in the San Gabriel Mountains.

This is one of the largest fires ever recorded in the county; the biggest blaze, 2009's Station fire, burned 160,000 acres in the Angeles National Forest. The Bobcat fire is only 15 percent contained, and is moving through communities in the Antelope Valley, the Los Angeles Times reports. There are more than 1,600 firefighters on the scene, with some coming from as far away as New York.

"We're still in the thick of a good firefight," Andrew Mitchell, public information officer with the U.S. Forest Service, said on Sunday. There were some flare-ups around Mt. Wilson Observatory overnight, but crews were able to stamp them out. Forecasters expect lower temperatures and calmer winds over the next few nights, and Mitchell said he thinks "the next couple days we'll start to really get a handle on this fire because the conditions will be right and we'll be able to really start backing it with all our assets."

There are 27 major wildfires now burning in California, the state's Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said on Sunday. Since mid-August, blazes in the state have killed 26 people and destroyed more than 6,100 structures. Catherine Garcia

9:21 p.m.

Emmy voters sure do love Regina King. And who can blame them?

King on Sunday won the Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie for her performance as Angela Abar in HBO's Watchmen. This was her fourth Emmy victory, after having previously won acting prizes twice for American Crime and once for Seven Seconds.

King accepted her Emmy remotely during the virtual show while wearing a Breonna Taylor shirt, and she ended her speech by urging Americans to vote, adding, "Rest in power, RBG."

This comes after King in 2019 won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in If Beale Street Could Talk. And speaking of the Academy Awards, she's already generating some Oscar buzz ahead of 2021's ceremony, not for acting but this time for directing. King made her directorial debut with One Night in Miami, which is earning rave reviews and is widely seen as placing her in contention for a Best Director nomination. If she indeed scores a nomination, she'll be the first Black woman ever nominated for Best Director at the Academy Awards, and if she wins, she'll be only the second woman ever to do so after Kathryn Bigelow for The Hurt Locker. Just five women have ever been nominated for Best Director in Oscars history. Brendan Morrow

9:08 p.m.

Schitt's Creek is going out on top.

The show just pulled off a sweep at the Emmys, winning every single comedy award during Sunday's broadcast, including Outstanding Comedy Series.

Schitt's Creek's four main stars — Eugene Levy, Dan Levy, Catherine O'Hara, and Annie Murphy — were all awarded Emmys for their performances. This makes Schitt's Creek the first comedy in history to win all four comedy actor Emmys. The show also won Emmys for writing and directing.

The series' domination was especially notable after it went without any Emmy love throughout the majority of its six-season run. It wasn't until 2019 when the show finally earned its first nominations for its penultimate season, and before 2020, it had never won a single Emmy.

But the show picked up serious momentum as its final episodes debuted earlier this year and after new viewers caught up on past seasons on Netflix, similar to the streaming boost series like Breaking Bad received late in their run. The result is that, according to Gold Derby, Schitt's Creek is now just the third show ever to win the main comedy series Emmy for the first time in its final season, with the previous two being Barney Miller and Fleabag. Hey, better late than never, right? Brendan Morrow

8:34 p.m.

Schitt's Creek is off to a strong start at the Emmys.

The acclaimed comedy kicked off Sunday's Emmys with back-to-back wins for its two stars, Catherine O'Hara and Eugene Levy, who won Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series and Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series, respectively. Both stars were together in Ontario, Canada, where the show's cast gathered at an event "adhering to Ontario’s COVID-19 guidelines," according to the series' Twitter account.

This was the first Emmy for both O'Hara and Levy since the 1980s, when they picked up writing Emmys for their work on SCTV Network. Neither performer had been nominated for their work on Schitt's Creek until last year.

Levy also co-created the show with his son, Dan Levy, who was also with the cast and crew in Ontario and won his own Emmy for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series. Brendan Morrow

8:20 p.m.

Jimmy Kimmel is kicking off a highly unusual Emmys with a highly unusual opening monologue.

Kimmel hosted Sunday's virtual Emmys from the Staples Center in Los Angeles. But seeing as the show was taking place amid the COVID-19 pandemic, he had no audience, with all of the nominees joining him remotely from various locations.

At least, that's what was revealed after a few minutes — Kimmel first opened the show with a typical awards show monologue for what he called the "Pandemmys" in front of what appeared to be a packed crowd, but was actually old Emmys footage. Soon enough, after Kimmel ran through jokes about the nominees and how "the world may be terrible, but TV has never been better," the fake audience footage was nixed as Kimmel admitted there was actually no one in the crowd other than some cardboard cutouts of celebrities.

"I'm up here all alone," Kimmel said. "...Of course we don't have an audience. This isn't a MAGA rally. It's the Emmys." Brendan Morrow

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