October 22, 2018

WikiLeaks founder and longtime resident of Ecuador's London embassy Julian Assange now has to pay for his own medical bills and phone calls, clean up his bathroom and living area, and take care of his cat, including paying for its food and cleaning the litter. Assange is suing Ecuador and its foreign minister, Jose Valencia, arguing that the new protocols are unfair and were created without his input. The obligations to clean up after his cat are particularly "denigrating," his lawyer Baltasar Garzón said at a news conference in Quito on Friday.

Assange sought asylum in Ecuador's London embassy in 2012, evading a Swedish arrest warrant for suspected sexual assault. Sweden later dropped the investigation, but Britain says it will arrest him if he leaves the embassy for violating the terms of his bail. Assange, who gave a boost to President Trump during the 2016 election, has said he believes Britain would extradite him to the U.S. to face prosecution for publishing thousands of classified military and diplomatic documents. Ecuador granted Assange, an Australian national, citizenship in 2017, then briefly tried to name him to a diplomatic post in Russia, Reuters reports.

Assange "has been held in inhuman conditions for more than six years," Garzón said. "Even people who are imprisoned have phone calls paid for by the state." He also said Assange hasn't had internet access since March, contradicting a statement from WikiLeaks last week. Garzón did not say who has been cleaning up after Assange's cat for six years. Valencia, named in the lawsuit because he is the intermediary between Assange and Ecuador's government, said Ecuador "will respond in an appropriate manner," but "the protocol is in line with international standards and Ecuadorian law." Peter Weber

7:03 p.m.

Michelle Janavs, the heiress to the Hot Pockets fortune, was sentenced to five months in prison on Tuesday after admitting to paying bribes to a fixer who promised to get her two daughters into the University of Southern California.

She is the 15th parent sentenced as part of the college admissions scandal, which rocked Hollywood and wealthy enclaves across the United States. Janavs, 49, of Newport Beach, California, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud and conspiracy to commit laundering. "I'm so very sorry I tried to create an unfair advantage for my children," she told the court on Tuesday.

Federal prosecutors said she agreed to pay Rick Singer, a college admissions consultant, $100,000 to improve her daughters' ACT exam scores and $200,000 to have one of her daughters admitted to USC as a fake beach volleyball recruit. Janavs must also pay a $250,000 fine and serve two years of supervised release after her stint in prison.

Prosecutors had recommended Janavs serve 21 months in prison. Her defense lawyers argued that she was the victim of Singer's "manipulative sales tactics," and her public embarrassment was enough of a punishment. Catherine Garcia

6:45 p.m.

The second Democratic debate in a week — and the last before the South Carolina primary on Saturday — airs Tuesday evening on CBS News from 8 p.m. ET to 10 p.m. ET. The debate will also mark the candidates' last chance to appeal to voters ahead of Super Tuesday on March 3, when residents of 16 states and territories will have the opportunity to cast their ballots.

Appearing on the stage in Charleston will be Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who stands as the decisive frontrunner after the Nevada caucuses last Saturday, as well as former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg; former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg; Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren; former Vice President Joe Biden; Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar; and billionaire philanthropist Tom Steyer, who returns after having not qualified for the Nevada debate stage six days ago. CBS Evening News anchor Norah O'Donnell and CBS This Morning co-host Gayle King are set to moderate.

The debate will air live on CBS stations (you can find yours here) and stream on Apple TV, Roku, and Amazon Fire TV via CBSN. The debate can also be streamed live on Twitter, Facebook, or watched below on YouTube. Jeva Lange

6:38 p.m.

There are still two weeks left to file for a Senate run in Montana, so Democrats are taking one last shot at convincing Montana Gov. Steve Bullock to throw his hat into the ring.

Bullock, who ran a short-lived presidential campaign last year, has always maintained he views himself as an executive and said he doesn't have any interest in sitting in Congress' upper chamber. But Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer flew out to Montana last weekend, anyway, in the hopes of changing his mind, multiple sources familiar with the meeting told Politico.

It remains to be seen if anything came of it — Bullock's office didn't respond to requests for comment, while a spokesperson for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee declined to comment.

Democrats, who are outnumbered 53-47 in the Senate, believe that if Bullock challenges Sen. Steve Daines (R-Mont.), it will put the state back into play immediately. Read more at Politico. Tim O'Donnell

5:35 p.m.

He was just a little bit off on that one.

During Senate testimony Tuesday, Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf was grilled by Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.) about the United States' preparedness for a potential coronavirus outbreak. At one point Kennedy asked Wolf about the virus' fatality rate, which Wolf said was likely somewhere between 1.5 and 2 percent. He then veered off course by telling Kennedy that the flu's fatality rate is in the same ballpark, which is not correct or even particularly close.

Kennedy didn't seem convinced, but opted not to press Wolf more on the flu stats. That didn't mean he let him off the hook generally, however. The senator was not pleased with Wolf's answers to a number of his questions and reportedly grew visibly irate at times, The Hill reports.

The Trump administration as a whole has taken some criticism for what some perceive to be a lackadaisical, overly-optimistic response to the outbreak. Tim O'Donnell

5:13 p.m.

As President Trump capped his visit to India on Tuesday, he praised Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's commitment to religious tolerance in the country.

"We did talk about religious freedom, and I will say that the prime minister was incredible in what he told me," Trump said during a press conference. "He wants people to have religious freedom, and very strongly."

It probably isn't realistic to expect Trump to have said anything else or criticize his host, especially after he was so pleased with how he was received during his visit. But the praise was juxtaposed against violent outbreaks in New Delhi on Tuesday spurred by a Modi-backed law, which excludes Muslims from a list of migrant groups who are granted a path to Indian citizenship if they can prove they're fleeing persecution from neighboring countries.

The U.S. State Department and Congress have expressed concern over the citizenship law and other actions viewed as part of a crackdown against India's Muslim population conducted by Modi's Hindu nationalist government. But Trump seemingly wasn't willing to cross that line during his trip. He did say he asked Modi about it, but ultimately he wants to "leave that to India." Read more at The Washington Post. Tim O'Donnell

4:54 p.m.

In a surprise announcement, Disney has named a successor to its longtime CEO Bob Iger, who oversaw a banner year for the company in 2019, including the successful launch of a new streaming service and box office domination. Bob Chapek, the parks division head and a 27-year veteran of The Walt Disney Company, will replace Iger immediately, with Iger assuming the role of executive chairman until his contract ends on Dec. 31, 2021.

"With the successful launch of Disney's direct-to-consumer businesses and the integration of Twenty-First Century Fox well underway, I believe this is the optimal time to transition to a new CEO," Iger said in a statement.

Iger has headed The Walt Disney Company for the past 15 years, recently publishing a memoir about his experience; the end of his tenure is a "seismic move" for the company, The Hollywood Reporter writes. Others have noted the strange and abrupt timing of Iger's exit, with strategist Matthew Ball observing on Twitter that the decision comes as Iger is "14 months into 36 month extension" and that he "didn't do this during blow-them-away earnings a few weeks ago."

Named the 2019 businessperson of the year by Time, Iger's announcement also follows a year when Disney dominated 33 percent of all domestic box office grosses, marking "the first time since at least 1999 that a single studio has commanded this much box office revenue in the U.S. and Canada," Variety reports. Disney+, which launched last November, garnered a massive 10 million subscribers within a day of its launch.

"Iger is unassailable," Time wrote in its profile last year, before Iger's surprise announcement. "He's transformed his company from a stuffy media doyen into a sexy cultural force. He can glide to retirement in 2021 on the fumes of that triumph." Jeva Lange

4:26 p.m.

One day after President Trump tweeted that the stock market is "starting to look very good to me," the markets once again took a dive.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 879 points on Tuesday after the Centers for Disease Control came out with a dire warning about the coronavirus, saying its community spread in the United States appeared inevitable and Americans should be ready for the potential of major disruptions in their lives, CNBC reports.

Additionally, the S&P 500 on Tuesday fell about 3 percent, and CNBC notes that "the last time the S&P 500 fell more than 3 percent two days in a row was in November of 2008 during the financial crisis," citing Bespoke Investment Group.

Dr. Nancy Messonnier of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases said Tuesday that the coronavirus spreading in the U.S. is "not so much of a question of if" but rather "a question of when," and "we are asking the American public to prepare for the expectation that this might be bad," The New York Times reports.

This came after the Dow on Tuesday plunged 1,031 points in what NBC notes was its worst performance in two years. Brendan Morrow

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