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June 3, 2019

Democratic presidential candidates may have found a new singular enemy, and it's not President Trump.

Over the weekend, fourteen candidates descended on the California Democratic Party's convention and made it clear they're not onboard with Joe Biden's campaign to bring back the old America. And while they didn't exactly mention Biden by name, their takedowns of his ideas mark a big development among tame campaigners who've so far hesitated to even mention Trump, Bloomberg reports.

Biden wasn't among the candidates who traveled to California this weekend, but it seemed pretty clear that Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) was talking about the former vice president when he pledged there can be "no middle ground" on certain liberal priorities. "We cannot go back to the old ways, we have got to go forward with a new and progressive agenda," Sanders said — an obvious callback to Biden's announcement video promise to restore "everything that has made America America."

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), meanwhile, rebuked the idea that "if we all just calm down, the Republicans will come to their senses." That sounds an awful lot like how Biden said last month that Republicans will have "an epiphany" and start working with Democrats again once Trump loses. South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg similarly said "the riskiest thing we could do is to try to play it safe" because "there's no going back to normal right now."

Read more about Democrats' anti-Biden swings at NPR and Bloomberg. Kathryn Krawczyk

1:39 a.m.

Talks between Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro's government and the country's opposition party are officially done, six weeks after Maduro's representatives stopped attending the discussions.

Opposition leader Juan Guaidó made the announcement on Sunday. The talks, mediated by Norway and held in Barbados, were called as a way to try to end the escalating political crisis engulfing Venezuela. Millions of people have left the country, due to poverty, inflation, and food and medicine shortages. Guaidó, the leader of Venezuela's National Assembly, said Maduro was not fairly elected in 2018, and he is the legitimate president, an assertion backed by the United States and dozens of other countries.

The opposition tried to launch a military uprising in the spring, but it failed, and Maduro has retained power, refusing to step down. In August, his representatives left the talks, citing President Trump's new sanctions against the country. When talks were still taking place, the opposition called for a new, free election, but Maduro's representatives would not even broach the subject, Reuters reports. Catherine Garcia

1:16 a.m.

Purdue Pharma, the drugmaker accused of playing a major role in the opioid epidemic, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in New York on Sunday. The move was expected after the company and its owners, the Sackler family, reached a tentative settlement with 24 states and thousands of local governments last week. Under the settlement, the Sacklers would wash their hands of Purdue, putting up $3 billion of the family's estimated $13 billion fortune and turning Purdue into a trust, with profits from OxyContin and other drugs going to the plaintiffs.

This isn't the end of the road for Purdue yet, though, as The Associated Press explains.

The thousands of plaintiffs who have not yet signed on to the settlement, including about half of U.S. states, will likely object to the settlement in bankruptcy court, and there are open questions about whether the proposed settlement is really worth $12 billion and how the money would be distributed. Purdue and the lawyers representing the parties that agreed to the settlement argue that nobody is served by long, costly litigation.

Recent court filings suggest much of the Sackler wealth has been stashed offshore since 2008, making it likely out of reach of U.S. plaintiffs, especially if the company dissolves without admitting wrongdoing or being found guilty in court. "The Sacklers are going to be left with plenty of money after this,'' Adam J. Levitin, a bankruptcy expert at Georgetown Law, tells The Washington Post. "There is a desire that the Sacklers pay some blood money, but it's never going to be enough to make everyone happy.''

OxyContin accounts for only a slice of the opioid drugs sold in the U.S., but Purdue's aggressive and misleading marketing is blamed for helping spark the opioid addiction crisis. Since 1999, more than 200,000 people have died from overdoses of prescription opioids. Peter Weber

12:54 a.m.

No deal was reached on Sunday between the United Auto Workers and General Motors, resulting in about 49,000 union members going on strike at midnight Monday.

This is the first national UAW strike since 2007, and was authorized Sunday morning in Detroit during a UAW meeting of regional leaders. The UAW said it is asking for more affordable health care, fair wages, and profit sharing, and could not reach an agreement with GM. "We stood up for General Motors when they needed us most," UAW Vice President Terry Dittes said in a statement. "Now we are standing together in unity and solidarity for our members, their families, and the communities where we work and live."

GM said it offered better health benefits and to create more than 5,400 new jobs, adding, "We have negotiated in good faith and with a sense of urgency. Our goal remains to build a strong future for our employees and our business." Contract talks will start back up again Monday morning, UAW spokesman Brian Rothenberg said. Catherine Garcia

12:09 a.m.

In his new memoir, former British Prime Minister David Cameron says he believes current Prime Minister Boris Johnson only backed Brexit because "it would help his political career."

Cameron is candid when it comes to sharing his feelings about Johnson and Michael Gove, a fellow Conservative Party member who served in Cameron's cabinet and is now chancellor to the Duchy of Lancaster. U.K.'s Sunday Times published an excerpt of the memoir, in which Cameron calls the men "ambassadors for the expert-trashing, truth-twisting age of populism" and accuses Gove of being disloyal to both him and Johnson.

Because the Conservative Party's manifesto committed to holding a referendum on the U.K.'s membership in the European Union, Cameron called for a vote in 2016. The Leave campaign won, with 52 percent of the vote compared to Remain's 48 percent. Cameron was in favor of remaining, and he says Johnson merely took the "lead on the Brexit side — so loaded with images of patriotism, independence, and romance — [so he] would become the darling of the party." Johnson, he continued, "risked an outcome he didn't believe in because it would help his political career."

Cameron, who resigned as prime minister shortly after the vote, told the Times on Saturday that he understands "some people will never forgive me" for calling the referendum. Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson is one of those people, saying Cameron "put the interests of the Conservative Party ahead of the national interest." Catherine Garcia

12:03 a.m.

President Trump had some pretty belligerent language Sunday about the perpetrators of an attack Saturday on Saudi Arabia's state oil company, Saudi Aramco, saying the U.S. is "locked and loaded depending on verification" of the "culprit," but "are waiting to hear from the Kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of this attack, and under what terms we would proceed!" Trump didn't identify the suspected culprit, but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pointed the finger at Iran. Iran denies any involvement, and Yemen's Houthi rebels, frequently bombed by the Saudis, claimed responsibility.

The idea that the U.S. should attack another country, presumably Iran, if Saudi Arabia thinks that's what should be done, because the Saudi oil supply was disrupted, didn't sit well with everyone, including — but not onlyDemocrats.

But Trump would likely have disapproved, too, a few years ago.

Things have been tense in the region for months, with oil tankers attacked or seized as the U.S. seeks to strangle Iran's oil exports. "Because of the tension and sensitive situation, our region is like a powder keg," warned Iranian Brig. Gen. Amir Ali Hajizadeh. "When these contacts come too close, when forces come into contact with one another, it is possible a conflict happens because of a misunderstanding." Peter Weber

September 15, 2019

In response to drone attacks on an oil site in Saudi Arabia on Saturday, President Trump tweeted on Sunday evening that there is "reason to believe that we know the culprit," and the United States is "locked and loaded depending on verification."

Trump said he is "waiting to hear from [Saudi Arabia] as to who they believe was the cause of this attack, and under what terms we would proceed!" Oil prices rose sharply over the weekend, and Trump said he has authorized the release of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve "if needed."

The extent of damage to the Aramco site is unknown, as reporters are being kept from the area. Aramco, Saudi Arabia's national petroleum and natural gas company, said the attacks curtailed output by 5.7 million barrels a day. The Houthi rebels in Yemen, backed by Iran, claimed responsibility for the attacks, but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Sunday there is "no evidence the attacks came from Yemen." He instead placed the blame on Iran, accusing the country of facilitating an "unprecedented attack on the world's energy supply." Iran denies the allegations. Catherine Garcia

September 15, 2019

Ric Ocasek, the lead singer of the new wave band The Cars, died Sunday in New York City. He was 75.

Ocasek was found unconscious and unresponsive in his Manhattan home late Sunday afternoon, and was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. He appears to have died of natural causes, people with knowledge of the situation told Page Six, and was discovered by his estranged wife, model Paulina Porizkova.

The Cars, known for their hits "Drive," "Just What I Needed," and "It's All I Can Do," were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2018. Ocasek was also a successful producer, working with everyone from Weezer to No Doubt to Bad Brains. Catherine Garcia

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