Biden faces GOP backlash after reports of Afghanistan decision

Lindsey Graham.
(Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

GOP lawmakers aren't thrilled that President Biden is reportedly expected to announce that a full troop withdrawal from Afghanistan will take place by Sept. 11, 2021.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) called it a "grave mistake," while Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) said it's a "reckless and dangerous decision," arguing that while "no wants a forever war ... I've consistently said any withdrawal must be conditions-based." (A Biden official said Tuesday that the withdrawal won't be conditional.)

A few other Republican senators got their shots in, as well. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), for one, didn't hold back, describing a full withdrawal as "dumber than dirt." He maintained that at the very least a "residual counterterrorism" force should remain as an "insurance policy against [the] rise of radical Islam in Afghanistan." Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa) questioned the target date, which doubles as the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. "I think a random withdrawal just because you're celebrating an anniversary is not the right decision," she said, per Fox News.

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Not everyone was so harsh. Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) left the door open, saying that "If we're ready to go, I'll be be supportive," but adding "If we're not ready to go, I'll be making that very clear." Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), on the other hand, simply said he's happy the troops are presumably "coming home."

Then there's Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), who also isn't a huge fan of Biden's reported new strategy, except on the basis that it's too late. He urged the White House to stick to the May 1 deadline, which was set in an agreement between the Trump administration and the Taliban, though he did concede that it's "better late than never."

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