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Big Tech: It's like a whole other country. Last month, The Atlantic's Adrienne LaFrance made the case that Facebook is "the largest autocracy on Earth." Now, in the latest issue of Foreign Affairs, Ian Bremmer argues we're living in a "technipolar moment" in which companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook have become so powerful and ubiquitous they function much like independent countries — albeit without the borders that usually mark the limits of nation-states.

"These companies exercise a form of sovereignty over a rapidly expanding realm that extends beyond the reach of regulators: digital space," Bremmer writes. "They bring resources to geopolitical competition but face constraints on their power to act. They maintain foreign relations and answer to constituencies, including shareholders, employees, users, and advertisers."

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