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July 15, 2014

It's been more than a decade since the release of Tommy Wiseau's lovably awful melodrama The Room, which continues to run in sold-out midnight screenings across the country. But apart from a few short side projects, fans have had no choice but to patiently wait for a follow-up.

At long last, the wait is over. Wiseau's latest full-scale project — a fascinatingly bizarre-looking sitcom called Tommy Wiseau's The Neighbors — is on the way, and the official website says we'll be able to see the pilot as early as September 2014.

According to the official synopsis,

The Neighbors is a sitcom about the relationship between a group of neighbors who live in an apartment building. The lead character is Charlie, the manager of the building. The tenants are a diverse group of personalities: all of different ages and backgrounds. Constantly bringing their problems to Charlie and his secretary/girlfriend Bebe. The character of Princess Penelope creates a commotion after she witnesses the ghost of her uncle Prince Charles. It is a fresh and humorous look at human behavior through different points of view. This cocktail of characters always guarantees plenty of surprises. The demographic is all inclusive. [The Neighbors]

Fortunately for all of us, Wiseau also posted a characteristically gross and incomprehensible clip from the series — a scene in which he and Lula, a partygoer, discuss their underwear, which happens to have Wiseau's name all over it. Check it out below, and imagine what the other 29 minutes might contain. --Scott Meslow

2:13 p.m. ET
Courtesy image

"There are a number of things in life that can calm down just about anybody; burning wood fires, and hanging out in hot tubs are chief among them," says J.D. Digiovanni at HiConsumption.com.

The Soak outdoor wood-fired hot tub ($4,450), created by a Canadian design and fabrication firm, combines both pleasures. Made from marine-grade aluminum, stainless steel, and red cedar, this tub for two heats up via a wood fire or propane. The tub's Bauhaus-inspired modernist lines aren't what you expect from a wood-fired tub, but the look is "a great fit for almost any backyard." The Week Staff

2:00 p.m. ET
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Verizon reached a deal Friday with two labor unions representing 39,000 employees, Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez has announced. The four-year agreement is now being put into writing, and the employees are expected to go back to work next week.

The deal puts an end to six weeks of strikes over pay and pension cuts. Between 35,000 and 39,000 Verizon employees walked off their jobs in April, making it the largest strike in U.S. history.

"This tentative resolution is a testament to the power of collective bargaining. I commend the leadership of Verizon, CWA, and IBEW for their commitment to resolving these difficult issues in the spirit of constructive engagement. I expect that workers will be back on the job next week,” Perez said in a statement. Jeva Lange

12:41 p.m. ET
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As the remaining Republican hold-outs against Donald Trump hunker down for the long haul, Mitt Romney is finding himself in lonelier and lonelier company. Having repeatedly spoken out against Trump to seemingly no avail, Romney confessed to The Wall Street Journal, "I know that some people are offended that someone who lost and is the former nominee continues to speak, but that's how I can sleep at night. And there are some people, though it's a small number, who still value my opinion."

Romney said that he realizes his comments against Trump could ultimately help Hillary Clinton, and he is still looking for a candidate who he can support in November. He will write one in if need be. "Others, including myself, believe our first priority should be to stand by our principles and if those are in conflict with the nominee, the principles come first," Romney said.

Trump has repeatedly countered Romney's attacks, calling him a "choker" and claiming "I've got a store worth more than he is." But when Romney's son Josh asked in March, "When the grandkids ask, 'What did you do to stop Donald Trump?' what are you going to say?" Romney realized there was only one way he was going to get through this election with a good conscience.

"I wanted my grandkids to see that I simply couldn't ignore what Mr. Trump was saying and doing, which revealed a character and temperament unfit for the leader of the free world," Romney said. Jeva Lange

11:55 a.m. ET
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Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) is voting for you know who in the presidential election. Though Rubio didn't come right out and say that he'd be voting for his former rival Donald Trump, it was heavily implied in his tweets Friday where he said that come November, not only will he not be voting for Hillary Clinton, but he also won't be abstaining from voting. That leaves just one other option:

Rubio followed up that tweet with emphasis on the fact that his change of heart has more to do with preventing Hillary Clinton from becoming president than suddenly loving Trump:

Just months ago, Rubio was chastising Trump for his supposedly little hands, calling him everything from an "embarrassment" to a "person that has no ideas of any substance on the important issues." So far, his supporters haven't been thrilled with his changed tone on Trump:

The true test for Rubio's new alliance will be whether he sticks with his original plan to sit out on the Senate race because a "real good friend" of his from Florida is now running, or whether he heeds Trump's advice and runs. Becca Stanek

11:10 a.m. ET

Bernie Sanders supporter Victor Vizcarra has — hands down — the most casually terrifying quote of the day:

It's like Batman's butler always said: Some people just want to watch the world burn. Jeva Lange

10:57 a.m. ET
Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)

Even though Donald Trump thinks he "looks like a spoiled brat," embattled pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli is still going to support him in the presidential race. In a tweet late Thursday, Shkreli — who gained infamy as CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals after raising the price of a drug by more than 5,000 percent — announced that he'd be voting for Trump over Hillary Clinton:

All Shkreli thinks Trump needs now is a running mate who is "seasoned in politics." But don't worry, it won't be him:

At least that's one bullet dodged. Becca Stanek

10:39 a.m. ET
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Is the politician you're talking to speaking in a deep, impressive voice? He probably thinks you're rich or important. That's just one conclusion of a new study from researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine, which found that politicians modulate their voices depending on the social status of their audience.

When conversing casually, politicians will speak as if they are addressing family, but in front of large groups, their voices often take on a sing-song quality. And among people of high stature, whom they consider peers, politicos will opt for that lower tone.

Dr. Rosario Signorello, who worked on the project, said similar habits have been observed in some animals, and he plans to study chimpanzees to see if the pattern holds.

Previous research has drawn another comparison between politicians and the animal kingdom: They are prone to use body language to convey personal size and power, like when Jeb Bush stood on tiptoes to look tallest during a GOP debate — or when his brother did the "gorilla walk," holding his arms in an ape-like manner. Bonnie Kristian

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