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August 3, 2015
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Donald Trump is back on top in the latest Monmouth University poll — and this time his lead is bigger than ever. A survey of Republican voters released Monday found that Trump "now holds a more than 2-to-1 advantage over his nearest rivals, Jeb Bush and Scott Walker." Trump comes in first with 26 percent, followed by Bush (12 percent) and Walker (11 percent).

Monmouth reports that Trump's support has increased by 13 percentage points in the span of just three weeks, when the last Monmouth University Poll was conducted, and is growing across "nearly all demographic groups."

"Republican support for Donald Trump just continues to grow with no clear sense of who his constituency really is," said Patrick Murray, director of the Monmouth University Polling Institute. "This makes it very difficult for his opponents to figure out how to take him in the upcoming debate."

The first Republican primary debate is scheduled for Thursday. Becca Stanek

3:33 p.m. ET
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After threatening to change its name for about a year and a half, Dunkin' Donuts has finally pulled the trigger.

The company announced Tuesday that starting in January, it will officially be known as just Dunkin'. A tweet posted to the official Dunkin' Donuts Twitter account said that "after 68 years of America running on Dunkin', we're moving to a first-name basis." Per CNN, this reflects the chain's efforts to re-brand itself as being "beverage-led," although the donuts are still staying on the menu. CEO David Hoffmann said the move is part of an effort to "modernize the Dunkin' experience for our customers," Business Insider reports.

This idea was first floated in April 2017, when a single location opened that was just called Dunkin', CBS News reported. Earlier this year, that name was applied to more locations, though the company clarified at the time that it would make a final decision about whether to roll the abridged name out nationwide at a later date, per Business Insider.

The decision has now been made, and you can expect the logo to start changing on signs across the country in a few months. And unlike that time IHOP briefly started calling itself IHOB, this decision appears to be permanent. Brendan Morrow

2:12 p.m. ET
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Bill Cosby on Tuesday was sentenced to three to 10 years in state prison for his conviction on charges of drugging and sexually assaulting former Temple University women's basketball administrator Andrea Constand at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in 2004. He was declared a "sexually violent predator," and will appear as such on a sex-offender registry for the rest of his life, reports The Associated Press.

The former comedian's defense lawyer argued that Cosby was no longer a threat to the public due to his age, 81, and the fact that he is legally blind. Montgomery County Judge Steven O'Neill decided that prosecutors had presented "clear and convincing" proof otherwise.

Constand submitted a victim impact statement in support of a strong sentence for Cosby. "Bill Cosby took my beautiful, healthy young spirit and crushed it," she wrote. "He robbed me of my health and vitality, my open nature, and my trust in myself and others." Cosby opted not to make a statement when the judge gave him a chance to speak in court Tuesday.

Cosby was facing up to 30 years in prison for three counts of indecent aggravated assault. More than 60 women have accused him of sexual misconduct, but only Constand's report led to criminal charges. Cosby has been on house arrest since his conviction in April. Summer Meza

1:35 p.m. ET
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One of the Republican senators on the fence about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is ready to listen to his accusers.

In an interview with The New York Times on Monday, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said that the vote on Kavanaugh is no longer about whether he is qualified to serve. Rather, she said, it's about "whether or not a woman who has been a victim at some point in her life is to be believed." Christine Ford has accused Kavanaugh of forcibly groping her at a party when they were both in high school, while Deborah Ramirez alleges Kavanaugh exposed himself to her at a drunken dorm party while they were both students at Yale University. Kavanaugh has denied both allegations, and he and Ford will testify before the Senate on Thursday regarding her accusation.

Murkowski told the Times that Ford's allegation disturbed her and that she's prepared to hear her out. "We need to be able to listen," she said. The senator also explained that she has been working over the past week to ensure that Ford's testimony didn't fall through because of her colleagues' "arbitrary timeline"; many Republicans insisted Ford had to testify Monday if at all. In a separate interview, Murkowski told CNN that Ramirez should come forward and "take the next step" like Ford so that her allegation can also be considered. At the same time, Murkowski made clear she will also listen to what Kavanaugh has to say.

Kavanaugh needs 50 votes in order to be confirmed, and there are 51 Republicans in the Senate. If Murkowski votes no, only one other Republican would have to break rank for Kavanaugh's nomination to go up in flames. There are reportedly up to seven Republicans undecided on the nominee — including Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), who told reporters Tuesday that "the hearing Thursday is an important one." Brendan Morrow

12:52 p.m. ET
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Amazon Prime announced Tuesday that its Thursday Night Football broadcasts would feature Hannah Storm and Andrea Kremer as commentators. Sports Illustrated reports that they are the first-ever female broadcasting team providing analysis for NFL games.

Storm, an ESPN anchor, and Kremer, an NFL Network correspondent, will make their debut during this week's match between the Minnesota Vikings and the Los Angeles Rams. Amazon Prime will give viewers four options when they watch football through the streaming service — a Fox broadcast with commentators Joe Buck and Troy Aikman, a team of U.K. analysts, a Spanish-language broadcast, and the Storm-Kremer partnership.

The duo will offer play-by-play analysis for 11 NFL games this season, reports Yahoo Sports. Amazon Prime emphasized the history-making aspect of the decision, announcing that "bringing two female announcers together to call an entire NFL game has never been done before." The service additionally touted Storm and Kremer's "extensive knowledge of the game." Both journalists have won awards for their sports coverage and have worked for decades in the industry. Summer Meza

12:11 p.m. ET

Netflix's true crime sensation Making a Murderer is making a return.

Netflix announced Tuesday that its documentary series about a Wisconsin man convicted of murder in 2007 will return with 10 new episodes on Oct. 19. The first installment of Making a Murderer, which was released in 2015, focused on Stephen Avery's conviction for the murder of photographer Teresa Halbach. Avery's nephew, Brendan Dassey, was also convicted of life in prison after confessing to helping murder Halbach, but the documentary suggested his confession was coerced. Avery also insisted that he did not kill Halbach, and the show framed his defense as truthful and the case against him as flimsy.

Per The Hollywood Reporter, filmmakers Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos say that while the first set of episodes focused on the experience of being accused of a crime, part two will be centered around "the experience of the convicted and imprisoned." Viewers will be introduced to Kathleen Zellner, Avery's post-conviction lawyer, and there will be plenty of interviews with Avery and his family as well. Meanwhile, Dassey's new lawyers, Laura Nirider and Steven Drizin, have attempted to appeal his conviction, and they'll also be in the new episodes. So far, Dassey's conviction was upheld by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in 2017, and the Supreme Court declined to hear the case in 2018. But Nirider has pledged to "continue to fight to free Brendan Dassey."

Netflix on Tuesday released a new teaser for the upcoming episodes. There isn't any new footage to parse, but the clip does include some interviews about appealing convictions. Watch below. Brendan Morrow

11:56 a.m. ET

President Trump on Tuesday spoke before the United Nations General Assembly in New York City, stressing America's sovereignty and accusing other nations of taking advantage of American generosity.

After getting off to a rocky start, Trump said he would "reject the ideology of globalism" and instead "embrace the doctrine of patriotism." Along those lines, he accused Iranian leaders of sowing "chaos, death, and destruction," calling Iran's government a "brutal regime" that is working to "spread mayhem across the Middle East and far beyond." He called on other nations "to isolate Iran's regime as long as its aggression continues."

Trump additionally drew OPEC into his line of fire, criticizing the oil-producing coalition and accusing participating nations of "ripping off the rest of the world." He said the U.S. defends "many of these nations for nothing, and then they take advantage of us by giving us high oil prices. Not good." OPEC nations "must contribute substantially to military protection from now on," he concluded.

He said that the U.S. would further sanction Venezuela, describing the "human tragedy" in the nation as a result of "anguish inflicted by the socialist Maduro regime," referring to Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. He urged other nations to "resist socialism and the misery that it brings to everyone." Taking a minute to denounce illegal immigration as harmful to "hardworking citizens," Trump said he wanted Latin American countries to "make their countries great again" to stem the flow of "crime, violence, and poverty" outside their borders.

To wrap up his "America first"-style speech, Trump leaned into nationalist sentiments. "We believe in self-government and the rule of law," he said. "We treasure our traditions. Above all, we love our country." Watch the full speech below, via CBS News. Summer Meza

10:57 a.m. ET

President Trump addressed the United Nations General Assembly in New York City on Tuesday, speaking directly to the gathered world leaders for the second time in his presidency. "One year ago, I stood before you for the first time," Trump said to begin his speech, explaining that he planned to update U.N. leaders on the "extraordinary progress we've made."

Rote introduction dispensed with, Trump's solemn tone forecasted a serious, on-message speech. That is, until his very next sentence. "In less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country," he said — prompting laughter from his audience. Trump interrupted himself to say his declaration was "so true," which only evoked heartier laughter from the crowd.

After an awkward beat, Trump relented: "Didn't expect that reaction, but that's okay," he said with a half-smile. Again, the crowd laughed, this time with applause. Watch the stunning moment below. Kimberly Alters

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