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December 31, 2015
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Twitter announced Thursday that it had reached an agreement with the two transparency organizations, Sunlight Foundation and the Open State Foundation, behind archiving tool Politwoops to bring back the archive of lawmakers' deleted tweets. The announcement reverses Twitter's decision earlier this year to revoke Politwoops' use of its API, which, The Hill reports, had provided "access to Twitter's stream and allowed developers to build the deletion archive around it."

Twitter initially made the decision to revoke access because it said the tool violated its privacy terms, resulting in criticism from those who thought an exception should be made for public officials. Twitter was vague about why it reversed the decision Thursday, only saying that it had reached an agreement "around Politwoops."

"In the coming days and weeks, we'll be working behind the scenes to get Politwoops up and running," the Sunlight Foundation said. "Stay tuned for more." Becca Stanek

3:22 a.m. ET

President Trump has zero major legislative accomplishments due in part to his crummy relationship with the Republican-led Congress, "but they don't want people knowing that," Trevor Noah said on Tuesday's Daily Show. So on Monday, Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) "came out to say that they're not just colleagues, they've been best BFFs forever." He played a clip of them showing love, and laughed. "It's funny watching these two try and sell us their romance," Noah said. "Who are they trying to convince? Because all you have to do is compare yesterday to every other thing that they've said." He showed some examples, then had second thoughts.

"I'm going to take that back — actually, that does sound like real love," Noah said, acting out an imaginary lovers' quarrel where Trump is throwing all McConnell's clothes out his Senate office window. But Trump did make people forget his strained relationship with McConnell by creating a new controversy about comforting the families of fallen troops. Noah was unimpressed with Trump's "dog ate my homework" excuse for not having mentioned the four U.S. soldiers killed in Niger 12 days ago, but less impressed that he dragged Barack Obama into it. "I don't know why Republicans insist on letting Donald Trump speak," he said, emoting pity for McConnell. "They should just stage relationship paparazzi pictures."

Noah shared more sympathy for McConnell during a break, showing off his "resting Mitch face" and using a bit of NSFW language. Peter Weber

2:07 a.m. ET

It took four late-night talk show hosts to tell the story of Conan O'Brien's gift horse. O'Brien kicked it off on Friday's Late Show, and Letterman told his version Tuesday on Jimmy Kimmel Live, on tour in Brooklyn. Letterman approached the horse story indirectly, describing his penchant for giving humorously inappropriate gifts — tires for a niece's wedding, his tie collection to Kimmel, cigarettes for his producer's son's bar mitzvah, and a horse to O'Brien, as thanks for a very nice article O'Brien wrote about Letterman before his retirement.

The idea, Letterman explained, was that he would send Conan a horse, Conan would send it back, and Letterman would get a refund. Instead, O'Brien kept it, and Letterman said he was irked at both the financial hit and the fact that Conan is now griping publicly about his gift. "You did send him the horse, in all fairness," Kimmel pointed out. "Yeah, it was a joke — take a dump on the stage, load him up, get him back — that's what it was," Letterman said. "The point is, no good deed goes unpunished." "And also, you know what?" Kimmel replied. "When in doubt, an edible arrangement is a nice gift." But Kimmel, who also likes a good practical joke, had his own gift for Letterman.

O'Brien took about nine minutes to tell Stephen Colbert his side of the story. Conan, it turned out, was expecting a nice bottle of wine, or — when he heard about the size of the package — a vintage Porsche. The story ended happier for the horse than for O'Brien. "I learned then that Dave is a genius, but he's an evil genius," Conan said. "He knew exactly what he was doing." Watch below. Peter Weber

2:02 a.m. ET
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In the process of forcing Rohingya Muslims to leave Myanmar, the country's military has killed hundreds of men, women, and children and burned down villages, a report out Wednesday by Amnesty International says.

Since 1982, Myanmar has denied citizenship to the Rohingya, and they are not one of the ethnic groups officially recognized by the government. On Aug. 25, an insurgent group called the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army attacked dozens of security posts, and in retaliation, Myanmar security forces have been going from village to village, burning down buildings and shooting residents as they try to run away, witnesses told Amnesty International. In the chaos, more than 580,000 refugees have made their way to Bangladesh, with about 60 percent of the refugees children.

Amnesty International has interviewed more than 120 Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, and they described villages being set ablaze, residents being shot at as they tried to escape, and the rape of women and young girls by Myanmar security forces. Many of those who died in the villages were sick, disabled, or elderly, and unable to flee from burning buildings, the witnesses said.

While it's not known how many people have died, satellite imagery shows the destruction of Rohingya buildings and mosques, with non-Rohingya dwellings just a few yards away intact, Amnesty International crisis researcher Matthew Wells told The Associated Press. "It speaks to how organized, how seemingly well-planned this scorched-earth campaign has been by the Myanmar military, and how determined the effort has been to drive the Rohingya population out of the country," he said. Catherine Garcia

12:40 a.m. ET
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President Trump surprised White House officials Tuesday morning when he invoked one of Chief of Staff John Kelly's sons, Marine 1st Lt. Robert M. Kelly, who was killed in Afghanistan in 2010, The Washington Post reports. Trump was speaking on Fox News Radio, responding to criticism over his untrue comments Monday that former President Barack Obama never called the families of fallen troops, a comment he walked back when challenged, saying he was "told" Obama didn't call, and "all I can do is ask my generals."

"For the most part, to the best of my knowledge, I think I've called every family of somebody that's died, and it's the hardest call to make," Trump told Fox News Radio on Tuesday. "I mean, you could ask General Kelly, did he get a call from Obama? You could ask other people."

White House officials then anonymously told Fox News, NBC News, The Associated Press, and The Washington Post that Obama did not call Kelly, then a Marine general, upon the death of his son. Robert Kelly, 29, was married, and typically the president would call the widow, not the parents, of a fallen service member. Gen. Kelly, who has been very careful that his son's death not be politicized and reportedly recoils at any grieving family being used for political points, did attend a May 2011 breakfast Obama hosted for Gold Star families, and he sat at first lady Michelle Obama's table. Kelly, unusually and without explanation, did not attend a Trump news conference Tuesday afternoon.

About two dozen service members have died during Trump's presidency, and AP found at least a few whose widows or parents said they never got a call or letter from Trump, though they said the military and other White House officials were very warm. Trump called the families of the four solider killed in Niger on Tuesday, after 12 days of silence. Peter Weber

12:35 a.m. ET

Rep. Frederica Wilson (D-Fla.) is revealing more about the conversation President Trump had with the widow of La David Johnson Tuesday afternoon, saying he made Myeshia Johnson cry. Had an Army sergeant not been holding the phone, Wilson said, she would have grabbed it and "cursed him out."

Army Sgt. La David Johnson, 25, was killed in Niger during an ambush earlier this month, along with three other soldiers. Wilson knew Johnson through a mentorship program she runs, and was in a limo with his pregnant widow and other relatives when Trump called. The phone was put on speaker, so everyone in the limo could hear what was being said, she told CNN, and while speaking to Myeshia Johnson, Trump said her husband "knew what he signed up for, but I guess it still hurts." Wilson said the mood in the limo was already solemn, as the family had just been told they couldn't have an open casket at Johnson's funeral. That information gave Myeshia Johnson "all kinds of nightmares about how his body must look now, his face must look, and that is what the president of the United States says to her?" Wilson said.

Trump's remarks were "off the cuff," Wilson told The Washington Post, and he kept "saying the same thing over and over." Myeshia Johnson was "just crying," she added, and "the only thing she said when it was time to hang up was 'thank you' and 'goodbye.'" In his community, La David Johnson was "our hero," Wilson told CNN, and Trump's comments were "not something that you say to a grieving wife." The White House would not comment on the phone call, saying the conversation was private. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017

They rescued her, and on Sunday, Nala returned the favor.

Nala, a boxer dog, was walking with her owners in their Lancaster, California, neighborhood on Sunday, when she jumped in front of them, protecting Cole Lewis, 10, and his mother from a Mojave green rattlesnake. "She waited until we were safe," Cole told ABC Los Angeles. "She stood her ground. She didn't whimper or anything when she got bit."

The snake bit Nala on the nose, making her bleed. Cole's stepfather, Anthony Borquez, knew that the faster you get help for a poisonous bite, the greater the chance of survival, and Nala was rushed to the vet. Nala got there in time, and is expected to go home soon. "She saved my life, and I just want to hang out with her now because she's my hero," Cole said. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017

A Florida congresswoman is upset over a comment President Trump made to the widow of U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson, one of the four troops killed earlier this month when they were ambushed by Islamist militants in Niger.

Rep. Frederica Wilson (D) told Local 10 News that Trump called Myeshia Johnson on Tuesday afternoon and they spoke for about five minutes, with Trump at one point telling Johnson: "He knew what he signed up for ... but when it happens it hurts anyway." "Yes, he said it," Wilson said. "It's so insensitive. He should have not said that. He shouldn't have said it." Myeshia Johnson is pregnant and due in January, and has two other children with her late husband, a 6-year-old daughter and 2-year-old son. After the phone call with Trump, Myeshia Johnson, her family, and friends went to Miami International Airport to wait for the Delta flight to arrive carrying her husband's flag-covered casket.

La David Johnson, 25, was a Walmart employee before becoming a member of the 3rd Special Forces Group at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Details surrounding the ambush that killed him on Oct. 4 are still murky, but the troops reportedly did not have any air cover and were in unarmored trucks when the attack took place. Trump has come under fire for not saying anything about the deaths or the botched mission, and he tried to turn things around by erroneously telling reporters that former President Barack Obama didn't call the families of fallen troops; he later tried to backtrack, saying Obama "probably did sometimes" call and "maybe sometimes he didn't. I don't know. That's what I was told." Catherine Garcia

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