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June 6, 2017

Over the course of a decade, New York Police Sgt. Chris Yip went from not knowing how to play a note to being a classically trained pianist who performs at venues across New York City to benefit nonprofit organizations.

Yip had always wanted to learn how to play the piano, but money was tight in his immigrant family, and there wasn't enough to pay for lessons. After working as a teacher and counselor at a nonprofit in Queens, Yip became an NYPD officer in 2004, and in 2007, while on patrol outside the Brooklyn Music School, the music he heard flowing out of the building pushed him into finally signing up for lessons.

He soon realized that as he played, the stress of his job evaporated. After years of practicing and weekly lessons, Yip, 37, decided to give back to the community by holding benefit concerts that raise money for scholarships and City Harvest, an organization that feeds the hungry. "I can use the performance to help someone else," he told People. "As officers, we see people who really could use some assistance." Catherine Garcia

11:56 a.m. ET

President Trump on Tuesday spoke before the United Nations General Assembly in New York City, stressing America's sovereignty and accusing other nations of taking advantage of American generosity.

After getting off to a rocky start, Trump said he would "reject the ideology of globalism," and instead "embrace the doctrine of patriotism." Along those lines, he accused Iranian leaders of sowing "chaos, death, and destruction," calling Iran's government a "brutal regime" that is working to "spread mayhem across the Middle East and far beyond." He called on other nations "to isolate Iran's regime as long as its aggression continues."

Trump additionally drew OPEC into his line of fire, criticizing the oil-producing coalition and accusing participating nations of "ripping off the rest of the world." He said the U.S. defends "many of these nations for nothing, and then they take advantage of us by giving us high oil prices. Not good." OPEC nations "must contribute substantially to military protection from now on," he concluded.

He said that the U.S. would further sanction Venezuela, describing the "human tragedy" in the nation as a result of "anguish inflicted by the socialist Maduro regime." He urged other nations to "resist socialism and the misery that it brings to everyone." Taking a minute to denounce illegal immigration as harmful to "hardworking citizens," Trump said he wanted Latin American countries to "make their countries great again" to stem the flow of "crime, violence, and poverty" outside their borders.

To wrap up his "America first" style speech, Trump leaned into nationalist sentiments. "We believe in self-government and the rule of law," he said. "We treasure our traditions. Above all, we love our country." Watch the full speech below, via CBS News. Summer Meza

10:57 a.m. ET

President Trump addressed the United Nations General Assembly in New York City on Tuesday, speaking directly to the gathered world leaders for the second time in his presidency. "One year ago, I stood before you for the first time," Trump said to begin his speech, explaining that he planned to update U.N. leaders on the "extraordinary progress we've made."

Rote introduction dispensed with, Trump's solemn tone forecasted a serious, on-message speech. That is, until his very next sentence. "In less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country," he said — prompting laughter from his audience. Trump interrupted himself to say his declaration was "so true," which only evoked heartier laughter from the crowd.

After an awkward beat, Trump relented: "Didn't expect that reaction, but that's okay," he said with a half-smile. Again, the crowd laughed, this time with applause. Watch the stunning moment below. Kimberly Alters

10:54 a.m. ET
Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Michael Kors

Accessory design giant Michael Kors on Tuesday purchased Italian luxury brand Versace for $2.1 billion, reports The Washington Post, and some Versace fans are not happy.

The luxury brand, founded by Gianni Versace in 1978 and currently helmed by his sister Donatella, sells high-end goods that often sell for five times as much as Michael Kors' sportswear items, says The Associated Press. When rumors of the sale began to swirl, Versace loyalists revolted, saying Kors would "ruin" or "kill" the brand. Some begged the brand to reconsider, writing, "think about what Gianni would want, Donatella ... please."

Kors reportedly wants to open about 100 new Versace stores, focus on selling shoes and accessories, and increase the brand's online shopping profile. The company hopes to more than double Versace's revenue in coming years. Donatella Versace will remain on as a creative director, and NPR reports that she and other family members will receive about $177 million worth of shares in the newly-formed parent company, Capri Holdings.

"STAY AWAY FROM VERSACE," said one Twitter user, echoing the sentiments of many others who said Kors would diminish Versace's "heritage" and "Gianni's memory." Others directly attacked Kors' designs as "tacky," and worried that Versace would "go from high-end luxury" to "duty-free cheap s--t you buy at the airport."

The Versace family, for their part, called it "a very exciting moment," reports USA Today, and said the sale "will allow Versace to reach its full potential." Read more at The Washington Post. Summer Meza

10:07 a.m. ET

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and his wife, Heidi, were heckled out of a restaurant in Washington, D.C., on Monday night by a group of protesters chanting, "We believe survivors."

Footage posted by the activist group on Twitter shows that one protester initially questioned Cruz about how he plans to vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, and Cruz declined to answer, saying, "God bless you, ma'am." Then, as chanting continued — mostly on-message, aside from one assertion that Cruz's election challenger, Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-Texas), is "way hotter" than the sitting senator — Cruz decided to leave:

This is not the first time a prominent Republican has been thus protested. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen was heckled in a Mexican restaurant in June, as was senior policy adviser Stephen Miller. White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was asked to leave a Virginia restaurant by its owner. Bonnie Kristian

9:59 a.m. ET
iStock/wutwhanfoto

It looks like Netflix's barrage of content won't be slowing down anytime soon.

Per entertainment analysis firm Ampere Analysis, Netflix currently has over 250 originals planned. That means there are more new projects on the way than have been released to date, per The Hollywood Reporter. Thus far, the streaming giant has put out 229 original shows.

In addition, the study shows that Netflix is continuing to focus on original sci-fi and comedy shows, as these genres both appeal to a younger audience. About 17 percent of the originals in the works are dramas, the study concludes; by contrast, that number is 29 percent for Amazon.

Part of the reason Netflix has ramped up its original production so significantly is that it now must compete with several new rival streaming services that did not exist a few years ago. Disney, for instance, has hosted content on Netflix since 2016. But in 2019, it will pull much of its library and take it to a streaming platform of its own.

Netflix, no longer as able to rely on other companies' content, must ensure that its own shows are enough to keep subscribers on board. As top Netflix executive Ted Sarandos put it in 2013: "The goal is to become HBO faster than HBO can become us." Brendan Morrow

9:47 a.m. ET

President Trump and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani are both in New York on U.N. business this week, but Rouhani has made it clear he does not want to meet his American counterpart.

"Naturally, if someone is keen on having a meeting and holding dialogue and creating progress in relationships, that person would not use the tool of sanctions and threats [and bring] to bear all of its power against another government and nation," Rouhani said Monday. "That means that the necessary willpower is absent in order to resolve outstanding issues." Tehran has consistently refused talks with the Trump administration since the president withdrew the U.S. from the Iran nuclear deal earlier this year, labeling Trump an "untrustworthy" diplomatic partner.

A day after Rouhani's remarks, Trump on Twitter claimed he'd rejected Rouhani's request for a meeting:

This forlorn effort to save face was undercut by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's statement on NBC's Meet the Press just two days ago that Trump has "been pretty clear" he is "happy to talk with" Iran "at any time." Bonnie Kristian

9:39 a.m. ET

The White House is "open" to the possibility of a second accuser testifying against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders appeared on Good Morning America on Tuesday and said that President Trump "would be open" to having Deborah Ramirez testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. Ramirez recently told The New Yorker that when she and Kavanaugh were students at Yale University, he exposed himself to her while drunk at a party. Kavanaugh denies the allegation.

Ramirez has not commented publicly on whether she would like to testify before lawmakers vote on whether to confirm Kavanaugh. The nominee will testify to refute claims from another woman, Christine Blasey Ford, who says Kavanaugh forcibly groped her when they were in high school.

"The president has been clear," said Sanders. "Let them speak, but let's also let Brett Kavanaugh speak." Watch the clip below, via Good Morning America. Summer Meza

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