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May 9, 2018
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The Trump administration is preparing to walk back child labor laws that are intended to protect teenage workers, Bloomberg Law reports. The proposal, which concerns dangerous work like "roofing ... operating chainsaws, and various other power-driven machines," would potentially allow 16- and 17-year-old apprentices and students to work full days under supervision. The law as it stands now only gives limited exemptions to minors to do that kind of work, with it typically limited to less than an hour a day.

"When I started doing this kind of work 20 years ago, we were losing 70 kids a year at work, and now we are losing usually 20 or less," said one opponent of the Labor Department's proposal, Reid Maki of the Child Labor Coalition. He added: "I would not be in favor of relaxing any of these standards; I think it would be a tragic mistake and would lead to the death of teenage workers."

President Trump has pushed for expanding apprenticeship programs, and his Labor Department argues that allowing 16- and 17-year-old students to perform such tasks under careful supervision gives them job opportunities, especially in cases where the teens are not on the path to attend a university. "We'd rather that they learn to use equipment the right way when they're 17 than use it for the first time when they're 18," explained Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta. At least one Democrat, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.), appears to also support the proposal to relax laws around underage workers.

Michael Hancock, formerly of the Labor Department's Wage and Hour Division, was skeptical that the WHD's 900-or-so employees would sufficiently be able to oversee teen workers. "When you find 16-year-olds running a meat slicer or a mini grinder or a trash compactor, we know kids are severely injured in those circumstances," he told Bloomberg Law. "That's why the laws exist in the first place." Jeva Lange

8:10 a.m. ET

President Trump tweeted Saturday evening in apparent response to Friday's news that an American academic working as an FBI informant met with several members of his 2016 campaign as part of the agency's then-beginning probe into Russian election meddling.

Friday's New York Times report about the informant said there is no evidence "the informant acted improperly" or that the inquiry was "politically motivated." Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), chair of the House Intelligence Committee, has already subpoenaed the Justice Department for documents pertaining to the informant, and House Freedom Caucus leader Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) said Friday the FBI's actions, if reports are correct, are "as wrong as it gets." Bonnie Kristian

May 19, 2018
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The 10 people killed in Friday's mass shooting at Santa Fe High School near Houston, Texas, were identified by Galveston County authorities Saturday: Sabika Sheikh, Ann Perkins, Angelique Ramirez, Shana Fisher, Kim Vaughan, Chris Stone, Cynthia Tisdale, Christian "Riley" Garcia, Jared Conard Black, and Kyle McLeod.

Perkins and Tisdale were substitute teachers; the other eight victims were Santa Fe students. Houston Texans player J.J. Watt has announced he will cover the cost of all 10 funerals.

Sheikh was an exchange student from Pakistan, and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Saturday sent his "deepest condolences" to her loved ones. "I don't blame the murder of my girl on American society but on that terrorism mindset that is there in all societies. We need to fight it all over the world," said her uncle, Ansar Sheikh. "I do ask the American government to make sure weapons will not be easily available in your country to anybody. Please make sure this doesn't happen again. It really hurts."

The suspect, Dimitrios Pagourtzis, has been arrested on multiple murder charges. He has given a statement "admitting to shooting multiple people" and reportedly told police he "did not shoot students he did like so he could have his story told." Bonnie Kristian

May 19, 2018
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First lady Melania Trump returned to the White House Saturday morning after being hospitalized for surgery Monday to treat a "benign kidney condition."

"She is resting comfortably and remains in high spirits," said a statement from her staff. "Our office has received thousands of calls and emails wishing Mrs. Trump well, and we thank everyone who has taken the time to reach out."

The embolization procedure, which is designed to block blood flow to a benign tumor or other abnormal tissue growth, was completed without complications. Bonnie Kristian

May 19, 2018

President Trump spent much of his first week in office making the demonstrably false claim that the crowd at his inauguration was the "biggest audience in the history of inaugural speeches" — and the BBC has not forgotten. BBC Three, which offers programming aimed at young adult audiences, seized the occasion of the royal wedding on Saturday to send out a snarky tweet:

All joking aside, though the London crowd may look larger in the photos included in the tweet, Reuters UK has estimated only 100,000 people turned out to watch the wedding in person. If that figure is correct, the wedding crowd is substantially smaller than Trump's inaugural audience, which federal agency estimates put at about 800,000.

In television viewership, however, the wedding has the inauguration beat: Early reports say the nuptials were watched by up to 2 billion people worldwide; domestic TV viewership of Trump's inauguration was 31 million. Bonnie Kristian

May 19, 2018
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European Commissioner for Energy and Climate Miguel Arias Canete announced in Tehran Friday that the European Union will protect from U.S. sanctions European companies that continue to do business with Iran despite President Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Iran nuclear deal.

This move comes at the behest of Iran deal signatories France, Germany, and the United Kingdom, which have sought to preserve the deal after America's exit. "We have sent a message to our Iranian friends that as long as they are sticking to the agreement the Europeans will ... fulfill their commitment," Canete said. "And they said the same thing on the other side."

"We hope [the EU's] efforts materialize," said Iranian nuclear chief Ali Akbar Salehi, because "America's actions ... show that it is not a trustworthy country in international dealings." Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has said Tehran will stay in the deal as long as Iranian interests are "guaranteed by its non-American signatories ... In that case, getting rid of America's mischievous presence will be fine for Iran." Bonnie Kristian

May 19, 2018
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Sens. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.), Mark Warner (D-Va.), and Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) sent a letter to the inspectors general of the State Department, Treasury Department, and the intelligence community on Friday asking for an independent investigation into the Trump administration's failure to implement Russia sanctions passed by Congress last year.

"[I]t seems clear that several weeks ago the administration had identified specific Russian entities that had played a role in supplying or otherwise supporting the government of Syria's chemical weapons program, had prepared a list of such entities for sanctions designation, and Ambassador Nikki Haley publicly announced their imminent designation," the letter says, "but then did not designate them, reportedly at the direction of the president."

The White House has said the penalties imposed by the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA) are unnecessary because the measure is already achieving its intended results. A State Department official said in January that the passage of CAATSA shows "significant transactions with listed Russian entities will result in sanctions. Sanctions on specific entities or individuals will not need to be imposed because the legislation is, in fact, serving as a deterrent."

The president has some executive discretion in enforcing the law, but its scope is the subject of legal debate. The senators' request is unlikely to be honored, The Washington Post reports, unless congressional Republicans support it as well. Bonnie Kristian

May 19, 2018

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were married in St. George's Chapel at Windsor on Saturday.

Markle wore a minimalist, structural silk gown with a bateau neckline, long sleeves, and a dramatic embroidered veil. The dress was created by British designer Clare Waight Keller, artistic director of Givenchy. Harry wore a bespoke cavalry uniform.

Though the vows were led by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, the homily was delivered by Bishop Michael Curry, the first African American to lead the Episcopal Church. "There's power in love," Curry preached. "We were made by a power of love and our lives were meant to be lived with that love."

The ceremony will be followed by an evening reception at Frogmore House. Watch three key moments of the morning's events — Markle's arrival, the choral performance of "Stand by Me," and the proclamation of marriage — via Kensington Palace below. Bonnie Kristian

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