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June 14, 2018
MICHAL CIZEK/AFP/Getty Images

After losing his spot in the White House and getting pushed out of Breitbart, Stephen Bannon has gravitated toward another band of outsiders.

He's investing in Bitcoin.

President Trump's former chief strategist has taken a stake in the cryptocurrency, he told The New York Times. Bitcoin breaks the rules, shatters the system, and "takes control back from central authorities," Bannon says — kind of like his far-right politics.

Bitcoin is popular within the alt-right fringe Bannon hangs around. Cryptocurrency payments bypass mainstream systems such as PayPal, which shut down connections to white supremacist sites last year, per the Times.

Bannon's White House history has leaked into his new investment as well. He's thinking of creating his own "deplorables coin," a cryptocurrency named for Hillary Clinton's unforgettable description for some supporters of President Trump in the 2016 election. And with one Bitcoin's value hovering around $6,500 today, Bannon probably won't need a whole basket to turn a profit. Kathryn Krawczyk

1:33 a.m. ET

Skye Savren-McCormick was a very important part of Hayden Hatfield Ryals' wedding, despite meeting each other for the first time just 48 hours before the big day.

Savren-McCormick, 3, lives in Ventura, California, and right before her first birthday, she was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia. She needed a bone marrow transplant, and it turned out Ryals, then a 22-year-old Auburn University student, was a perfect match. Donors must remain anonymous for the first year after a transplant, and Ryals and Savren-McCormick's parents started sending letters and emails back and forth in 2017.

Ryals surprised the family when she asked Savren-McCormick to be her flower girl, but it almost didn't happen; the toddler was still on oxygen two months before Ryals' June 9 wedding. In May, the family received good news: she could go off the oxygen and received medical clearance to fly to Alabama. There, Ryals and the Savren-McCormicks met face-to-face for the first time. "I feel so connected to them, they're like family now," she said. Catherine Garcia

12:51 a.m. ET

Is Tom Arnold filling a President Trump–shaped hole in Michael Cohen's life?



Probably not, but Arnold and Cohen, Trump's longtime personal attorney, did hang out on Thursday, and their get-together was documented on — where else? — Twitter. "I love New York," Arnold captioned the photo showing him next to a smiling Cohen. Arnold, a Trump critic, is working on a show for Vice called The Hunt for the Trump Tapes, using his show-business connections to try to find video evidence of Trump engaging in bad behavior. NBC News asked Cohen, who retweeted the photo, about the meeting, but he referred inquiries to Arnold.

There are a few links between the two — Cohen, now under investigation by federal prosecutors for his business dealings, served as Trump's fixer for years. Arnold's ex-wife, Roseanne Barr, is a vocal Trump fan, and it's a mutual thing, with Trump expressing his support for her. Maybe the latest connection will turn into a collaboration between Cohen and Arnold. Catherine Garcia

12:49 a.m. ET

Trevor Noah devoted an appropriate amount of Thursday's Daily Show to first lady Melania Trump's bizarre "wardrobe malfunction" — about 50 seconds — and he was confused about the message Trump was sending, too "'I REALLY DON'T CARE, DO U?' Wow," he said. "It looks like when Melania was in the hospital, she had her last f--k removed." At the same time, he added, "it is kind of sweet that she made a jacket out of her and Donald's wedding vows."

"Look, we could spend forever talking about how out-of-touch this makes Melania seem, but I don't really care, do you?" Noah said, moving on to some jokes about a Phillies fan hit in the head with a hot dog. Noah also touched on Burger King's strange offer to Russia women, Argentina's shocking World Cup elimination, and the new protest the "Charlottesville Nazis" are planning to demand white civil rights. "Yeah, that's right, they're demanding better treatment for white people in America — which, I'm just gonna put it out there, is gonna make this the most successful protest march in history," he said. "It's going to be, like, 'We demand civil ri...! Oh hey, we got them. Good march everyone.'" Watch below. Peter Weber

June 21, 2018

CNN's Chris Cuomo interviewed President Trump's former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski Thursday night, and tried multiple times to get him to answer a very specific question about Trump's immigration policy.

Cuomo said people are very confused by Trump's executive order regarding family separations at the border, and what happens now to children who are not with their parents. Lewandowski said "there's one problem at a time to solve," which set Cuomo off. "But he created the problem, Corey," the host said. "He came with the gasoline, he threw it on the house, he tossed the match, and he said 'let me grab a hose.'"

Cuomo then moved on to his next question: What is the Trump administration going to do to the employers who hire undocumented workers? Illegal immigrants looking for jobs "get treated like a dog and thrown in a cage," Cuomo said, while the employers keep hiring them with no consequences. Lewandowski dodged the question, and started listing off the names of people who are "dead because [of] illegal aliens." Cuomo continued to press Lewandowski for an actual answer to his question — watch the video below to find out if he ever succeeded. Catherine Garcia

June 21, 2018

Sure, Fox News goes out of its way to show its fealty and love to President Trump — it's Trump's No. 1 cable news channel, not just America's, after all. But is it really fair to compare Fox News to the state-run TV broadcaster of a murderous totalitarian regime that strictly prohibits outside news sources to the point that it created its own insular internet? The Daily Show did a little comparison shopping, creating a North Korea-Fox News "progagnda-off."

The main difference, you might conclude from these clips, is production quality and tone — the North Korea state broadcaster is perhaps a little manic-sounding for U.S. sensibilities. But Fox News has an actual news division, too, and unless North Korean state TV has its own Shep Smith, the comparison seems a little unfair. At the same time, two people familiar with preparations for the Trump-Kim Jong Un summit told The Washington Post, after watching some North Korean TV, Trump "talked about how positive the female North Korean news anchor was toward Kim" and "joked that even the administration-friendly Fox News was not as lavish in its praise as the state TV anchor." So stay tuned. Peter Weber

June 21, 2018
Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Throughout the 2016 campaign and even after the inauguration, President Trump's lawyer Michael Cohen would regularly receive digital copies of National Enquirer articles and cover images related to Trump and his political opponents before they went to press, three people with knowledge of the matter told The Washington Post.

Trump is close to David Pecker, the CEO of American Media Inc., the parent company of the National Enquirer. The stories passed along about Trump were always positive, the Post reports, and if Cohen made any changes, it was to pick a more flattering photo. Trump, several people said, would pitch stories to Pecker and also saw them before they went to print, including an article about Hillary Clinton's health and another about former GOP presidential primary rival Dr. Ben Carson allegedly botching operations.

Sam Nunberg, a former Trump campaign adviser, told the Post that the Enquirer was "such a help to Trump during the primary and even the general" that is was basically free advertising. The company's chief content officer, Dylan Howard, denied that the Trump camp had a say in the articles, adding that if the stories ever were shared, "it was not at the behest of me or David."

In April, FBI agents raided the office and home of Cohen, and people with knowledge of the matter say they took his records related to AMI, Pecker, Howard, and payments made to women who say they had affairs with Trump. Catherine Garcia

June 21, 2018
Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

ABC has ordered 10 episodes of a Roseanne spinoff called The Conners, to start airing this fall, the network announced Thursday night.

The Roseanne revival had high ratings in its first season, and was canceled last month after star Roseanne Barr made a racist tweet about Valerie Jarrett, a former adviser to President Barack Obama. Every lead actor from Roseanne, with the exception of Barr, will star in the spinoff. In a statement, ABC said Barr "will have no financial or creative involvement in the new series." Barr released her own statement, saying, "I regret the circumstances that have caused me to be removed from Roseanne. I agreed to the settlement in order that 200 jobs of beloved cast and crew could be saved and I wish the best for everyone involved."

BuzzFeed News reports that the show will focus on the Conner family as they deal with "a sudden turn of events" that rocks them all. The Conners will air at 8 p.m. in the time slot left empty by Roseanne's cancelation. Catherine Garcia

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