Daily Briefing

10 things you need to know today: June 3, 2019

Harold Maass
Donald Trump and Melania Trump in England
ISABEL INFANTES/AFP/Getty Images

1.

Trump arrives for state visit in U.K. locked in Brexit crisis

President Trump arrived in London Monday for a state visit that will include a banquet with Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace. Trump, who is beginning a five-day tour of Britain and France to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day, weighed in on the U.K.'s Brexit crisis, telling The Sunday Times in an interview ahead of his arrival that whoever replaces Theresa May as prime minister should "walk away" from negotiations on Brexit to get better terms from the European Union. Trump said Boris Johnson, the pro-Brexit former foreign secretary and ex-mayor of London, would make a good prime minister. [The New York Times]

2.

Alleged Virginia Beach killer had just submitted resignation

DeWayne Craddock, the man police say fatally shot 12 people in a Virginia Beach, Virginia, government office on Friday, had just notified his boss that he was quitting his job earlier in the day, city officials said Sunday. Craddock, who died in a gun battle with police, was an engineer for the municipal government who worked on city water and sewer systems. Investigators said he left behind no indication of a motive. "Right now we do not have anything glaring," Police Chief James Cervera said at a Sunday news conference. Craddock reportedly did not provide any clues in his resignation note. A person familiar with his email said he gave his two-week notice and there was "nothing out of the ordinary." [The Washington Post]

3.

Report calls killings, disappearances of indigenous Canadian women 'genocide'

A report on widespread killings and disappearances of indigenous women and girls in Canada said the violence amounts "to a race-based genocide of indigenous peoples." The report, to be released in a Monday ceremony, concludes that the "genocide has been empowered by colonial structures," and fueled by "appalling apathy." The report describes the chronic abuse of indigenous people, including at residential schools where indigenous children were once sent. Indigenous women and girls make up 4 percent of Canada's women and girls, but 16 percent of those killed. Royal Canadian Mounted Police figures show that 1,181 indigenous women were killed or disappeared in Canada from 1980 to 2012, but indigenous advocates say many deaths go unreported so the real number is higher. [The New York Times]

4.

Mulvaney says Trump is 'deadly serious' about Mexico tariffs

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney told Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace that President Trump is "absolutely, deadly serious" about imposing a five percent tariff on Mexican imports starting June 10. On Thursday, Trump tweeted that the tariff would remain in place "until such time as illegal migrants coming through Mexico, and into our Country, STOP." Mulvaney told Wallace the White House has been working on a plan "for months" to deal with an influx of migrants coming to the United States, and Mexico needs to tighten security along its southern border. "It is much easier to secure that border than it is our border because it is so much shorter," he said. "It is about a quarter of the length." Mexico's southern borders with Guatemala and Belize add up to roughly 700 miles. [Politico]

5.

Mexico and U.S. head into immigration, tariff talks

Mexican and U.S. officials said Sunday they were preparing for talks on averting a major trade fight following President Trump's threat to slap a 5 percent tariff on all Mexican goods starting June 10. Trump also has said he would hike the levies by 5 percent per month starting July 1 up to a maximum of 25 percent. Mexican Economy Minister Graciela Marquez said she and U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross would meet Monday in Washington. On Sunday morning, Trump tweeted that Mexico was an "abuser of the United States, taking but never giving." He added that Mexico was "sending a big delegation to talk about the Border. Problem is, they've been 'talking' for 25 years. We want action, not talk." [Reuters]

6.

Cruise ship hits tourist boat and dock in Venice, injuring at least 4

A massive cruise ship, the 65,000-ton, 2,100-passenger MSC Opera, hit a docked river boat and slammed into a busy wharf in Venice, leaving at least four tourists with minor injuries. Panicked onlookers ran for safety as the vessel, with its horns blaring, scraped the San Basilio Terminal on the Giudecca Canal. MSC Cruises said in a statement that the ship had a "technical issue" as it approached the dock. "The investigations to understand the exact causes of the events are currently in progress," the statement read. "Regarding these, the company is working closely with the local maritime and other authorities." "When we saw the ship bearing down on us, everyone began shouting and running," said a sailor who said he jumped off the tourist boat to get to safety on shore. [The Washington Post, NPR]

7.

Top Trump economic adviser Kevin Hassett to step aside

President Trump said Sunday that White House Council of Economic Advisers Chairman Kevin Hassett will step down "shortly." Trump did not say why Hassett was leaving, but he lavished praise on him. Trump said Hassett, the latest in a series of senior White House officials to resign, had "done such a great job for me and the Administration" and called him a "true friend." The president, who just arrived for a series of state visits in Europe, tweeted that Hassett's "very talented replacement will be named as soon as I get back to the U.S." Hassett's departure comes as the Trump administration's trade war with China intensifies, and Trump threatens to slap tariffs on all Mexican goods unless it curbs the number of undocumented immigrants trying to cross the U.S.-Mexico border. [CNBC]

8.

Creole chef and civil rights activist Leah Chase dies at 96

Leah Chase, the New Orleans chef known for Creole cuisine and civil rights activism, died over the weekend at her son's home. She was 96. Chase was the executive chef and co-owner of Dooky Chase's restaurant, a hub for the city's African-American community for decades. Chase married into the eatery and transformed it from a sandwich shop into a fine dining restaurant. Chase, who previously worked as a waitress in the French Quarter where many restaurants were for whites only, served whites and blacks together despite Jim Crow laws. Her restaurant became a gathering place for political and civil rights leaders. She served everyone from Martin Luther King Jr. to Ray Charles and Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush. "In my dining room, we changed the course of America over a bowl of gumbo and some fried chicken," she frequently said. [The New York Times, NPR]

9.

Study: ACA linked to lower racial disparities, faster cancer treatment

A new study released Sunday linked the Affordable Care Act to a reduction in racial disparities in cancer care, and earlier treatment of ovarian cancer. The racial-disparity study found that, before former President Barack Obama's signature health-care reform law took effect, African Americans with advanced cancer were 4.8 percent less likely to start treatment within 30 days of diagnosis. Now, the study found, black adults in states that expanded Medicaid under ObamaCare have caught up with white patients in swift treatment. Another study, released at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, found that ovarian cancer, one of the deadliest malignancies, is now being diagnosed in earlier stages and more women are starting treatment within a month, increasing their survival chances. [The Washington Post]

10.

Godzilla: King of the Monsters leads box office

Godzilla: King of the Monsters was the top movie at the North American box office this weekend, bringing in an estimated $49 million in its debut. The haul fell just short of expectations. The film was expected to bring in at least $50 million in North America, and did not have as strong of a start as 2014's Godzilla, which brought in $93 million. Godzilla: King of the Monsters also topped the international box office, earning $130 million. The Elton John biopic Rocketman starring Taron Egerton came in second, with $25 million, and the Octavia Spencer horror thriller Ma was third with $18 million. [The Hollywood Reporter]