No, Glenn Greenwald cannot be the one who decides what stays secret

In a world where anyone can claim to be a journalist, only government can decide what stays classified

Snowden
(Image credit: (AP Photo/Andre Penner))

This Sunday, The New York Times Book Review will finally print Michael Kinsley's review of Glenn Greenwald's No Place to Hide, two and a half weeks after the review was published online and provoked a polarizing debate involving Greenwald, the Times' Public Editor Margaret Sullivan, Kinsley again, and countless commentators who promptly took sides in the dispute about government secrecy and freedom of the press.

Some readers, including Sullivan, objected to Kinsley's smart-alecky tone and psychological sketches of Greenwald, Edward Snowden, and Julian Assange, which these critics saw as bordering on ad hominem attacks. But there were also more substantive criticisms levied by Sullivan and many others, most of them boiling down to the claim that it was simply outrageous of Kinsley to deny journalists an absolute right to print classified material passed on to them by leakers.

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