Time to go, Anthony Weiner

The sexting New York Democrat may not have done anything illegal. But after his string of dishonorable lies, voters should demand his resignation

Edward Morrissey

When is it time for a public official to resign? The scandal that erupted over the last 10 days involving Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) — his string of denials followed by a reversal at a surreal press conference on Monday — should have Americans considering just how low their expectations for public servants have fallen.

Give Rep. Weiner some credit. Unlike other politicians who have blamed personal peccadilloes on illnesses or addictions, Weiner didn’t offer any such excuse at his press conference. I had expected Weiner to claim a sexual addiction, and ask the press to leave him to his rehabilitation. Given the circumstances — some of these sexting "relationships" went back three years, and involved at least a half-dozen women — that excuse might have worked to generate at least a little sympathy. Weiner eschewed that, specifically denying that addictions had anything to do with his behavior.

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