Feature

Hotel of the week: Cavallo Point Lodge, Fort Baker, Calif.

Cavallo Point Lodge, on the grounds of the old military installation of Fort Baker just north of San Francisco, is a luxurious spa and center for environmentally themed conferences.

Cavallo Point LodgeFort Baker, Calif.

This historic site, set among “the spectacular string of promontories known as the Marin Headlands,” was reborn in July, said the editors of Travel + Leisure. Formerly of “great strategic value to the military,” the grounds of Fort Baker remain dotted with decommissioned gun batteries and missile installations. But this luxurious lodge, spa, and center for environmentally themed conferences has joined the old weaponry in the shadow of the Golden Gate Bridge. Guests stay in the restored former officers’ quarters, sleep on organic linens, and can indulge in “an herbal hot-stone massage” or relax at the Tea Bar.Contact: Cavallopoint.com

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