How Veep became TV's best show about broken people

On the disturbingly insightful season finale

"I hate this country," soon-to-be former President Selina Meyer says in the season finale of Veep. She has just lost her last chance not at the Oval Office but at Oval Office adjacency. Her only option, now, is to be a regular person. The question this season — Veep's fifth — leaves us with is whether she is even capable of living such a life. "I don't even remember how to drive," she says in another scene. "I need a wallet. And stamps. I gotta get stamps."

This last comment hints at one of the most jarringly anachronistic traditions in American government: franking privilege. According to this practice, members of Congress are allowed to send official mail by signing the envelope in lieu of using a stamp, and the privilege is also afforded to vice presidents and former presidents, as well as their spouses. When Jacqueline Kennedy married Aristotle Onassis, she lost her franking privilege because she was no longer, at least from a dynastic perspective, John F. Kennedy's widow.

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