What Medicare-for-all skeptics are missing

The biggest obstacle to any health care reform isn't public opinion

Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren.
(Image credit: Illustrated | Justin Sullivan/Getty Images, Bill Pugliano/Getty Images, Alex Wong/Getty Images, Win McNamee/Getty Images, EnginKorkmaz/iStock)

It's health-care season in the Democratic presidential primary. Following Bernie Sanders' famous Medicare-for-all proposal, Joe Biden has since published his plan, a sort of upgraded version of ObamaCare. Kamala Harris just released her plan as well, which is roughly halfway between Sanders and Biden. Both Biden and Harris would preserve a role for private insurance, at least in the medium term.

Meanwhile, Vox's Ezra Klein argues that leftists (like myself) have deceived the public about what Medicare-for-all would entail, and suggests disruption would be an insurmountable political obstacle. But Klein gets both the policy details and the political terrain wrong. Passing Medicare-for-all would indeed be an enormous effort. But getting as close to it as possible will be key to passing any quality health care reform at all.

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