Can Republicans take back suburbia in 2020?

4 big issues that could sway the suburban vote in the next election cycle

Houses.
(Image credit: Illustrated | ser_igor/iStock, malija/iStock, artishokcs/iStock)

The suburbs turned out to be the decisive battlegrounds in 2018's midterm elections. All signs suggest 2020's elections will be fought on the same turf.

Republicans lost voters in the midterms not just in the "dense suburban" districts closest to the urban cores, where Democrats already led, but also in "sparse suburban" districts where President Trump had built considerable support, as FiveThirtyEight's Geoffrey Skellen explained at the time. While it isn't unusual for the administration's party to lose seats in the midterms, the losses were larger than Republicans had expected. After seeing their electoral footprint shrink to the cities and the coasts over several cycles, Democrats came out of the midterms believing they had found a way to a Senate majority — and potentially a clear Electoral College win for the White House.

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