How earmarks can help fix Congress

Pork is good

The Capitol building.
(Image credit: Illustrated | iStock)

The House of Representatives has repealed its decade-old ban on earmarks, which allow individual representatives to direct money towards projects in their districts. The idea has been "pushed by Democrats trying to entice Republicans to support a major infrastructure package and other spending bills," reports The Wall Street Journal.

The argument against earmarks, of course, is that they enable "wasteful" spending, like the infamous "bridge to nowhere" in Alaska. But this is great news. Earmarks grease the wheels of politics, and they help tie the United States together as a functioning society.

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us