It wasn't all bad!

The week's good news: January 6, 2022

1

6th grader hailed as a hero after saving 2 lives in 1 day

Most people can't say that they've ever saved another person's life — then there's 11-year-old Davyon Johnson, who saved two lives in one day. Davyon is a sixth-grader from Muskogee, Oklahoma, who is "always willing to help, always just a friend to everyone," his principal, Latricia Dawkins, told The New York Times. On Dec. 9, Davyon noticed a schoolmate was choking, and he ran over to assist. Davyon wants to be an emergency medical technician and has watched YouTube videos on the Heimlich maneuver. Using those skills, he was able to dislodge the bottle cap stuck in his schoolmate's throat. Hours later, Davyon was driving with his mother when they saw smoke coming from the back of a house. They called 911, and Davyon ran to alert people inside about the fire. An elderly woman using a walker was struggling to get out, and Davyon guided her to safety. Davyon told the Times there's a simple reason why he helped his classmate and the woman: It was "the right thing to do."

2

Couple delivers hundreds of donated loaves of bread to stranded drivers

As soon as she saw the bread delivery truck, Casey Holihan began hatching a plan that would help her, her husband, John, and dozens of other people stuck on Interstate 95 in Virginia. The couple from Maryland was stranded on the icy and snow-covered road for more than 16 hours on Monday when Casey spotted a truck for Baltimore-based Schmidt's Baking Co. They had no food in the car, and Casey decided to call the company to see if they could have some of the bread in the truck. Schmidt's is part of H&S Bakery, and owner Chuck Paterakis quickly gave his approval. The driver opened the back of his truck, and the Holihans started delivering loaves of bread to cars along a two-mile stretch of road. "We just kept giving it out until we couldn't walk anymore because it was so freezing," Casey told WBAL. She was grateful for Paterakis' generosity, saying, "that is just so incredible that someone chose humanity over profit."

3

Chicago man launches group that uses books to connect dads with their kids

A decade after deciding to take a different path in life, Joseph Williams is helping other dads navigate the world of parenthood. Ten years ago, Williams, a father of six from Chicago, served nine months in prison for possession of a stolen vehicle. Upon his release, he dedicated himself to doing positive things in the community, including volunteering at his children's school. One day, he was asked to read a book to his daughter's class, and he was such a hit that the teacher and students asked him to return. Soon, other fathers said they wanted to join in, inspiring Williams to launch the Mr. Dad's Father's Club, an organization that offers enriching activities for kids on Chicago's South Side, as well as support for dads. There are now more than 150 fathers in the group, and they participate in reading and community outreach events and weekly fatherhood support groups. Their goal is to build a community center and library that will offer resources to parents and kids alike.

4

Habitat for Humanity builds 1st 3D-printed house in the United States

April Stringfield's dream of becoming a homeowner came true right before Christmas, thanks in part to a 3D printer. Her new house in Williamsburg, Virginia, is Habitat for Humanity's first completed 3D-printed home in the United States, created as a collaboration between Habitat for Humanity Peninsula and Greater Williamsburg and the 3D printing company Alquist. The 1,200-square-foot home has three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and was built from concrete, so it will better retain temperature and hold up against high winds. It usually takes Habitat for Humanity about four weeks to build a home, but this house took just 12 hours. It also comes equipped with a 3D printer, so Stringfield can reprint anything "from electrical outlets to trim to cabinet knobs," Janet Green, CEO of Habitat for Humanity Peninsula and Greater Williamsburg, told CNN. Stringfield is still settling in her new home, telling WTKR she's "excited to make new memories in Williamsburg and especially in a house, a home."

5

In a 'major win,' 2 Sumatran tiger cubs are born at the Dallas Zoo

It's cuteness overload at the Dallas Zoo, where two Sumatran tiger cubs were born on Dec. 6. The healthy cubs — a male and a female — each weighed about 2 pounds at birth, the zoo announced last week. Their mom is Suki and their dad is Kuasa, making them full siblings to Sumini, a cub born over the summer. Sumini was the first tiger born at the Dallas Zoo since 1948. Because Suki is having trouble with milk production, the yet-to-be-named cubs are being cared for 24/7 by several zoologists and veterinarians. An estimated 400 to 600 Sumatran tigers remain in the wild, and the zoo said in a statement that "each birth is a major win for this critically endangered species," adding, "we're thrilled to be able to contribute to the population once again with these adorable new additions." 

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