Winston Churchill's 1932 doctor's note shows New York doctors have always been colorful

Sir Winston Churchill, recipient of awesome doctor's note
(Image credit: Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Donald Trump — who is dramatically unveiling some (presumably positive) health news on the TV today — has one of the most famous doctor's notes in modern history. Dr. Harold Bornstein, a gastroenterologist who is apparently Trump's primary care physician, touted Trump's "astonishingly excellent" medical test results last December and proclaimed him the "healthiest individual ever" to near the Oval Office, and his new health update can only be a step down, in terms of color.

See more

But Dr. Otto Pickhardt, were he still alive, would fit just fine in the 2016 presidential race, as British journalist Amol Rajan reminds us:

See more

Winston Churchill's "postaccident convalescence" was necessary because, at the start of a U.S. speaking tour in 1932 (in his political "wilderness" years, when he was busy opposing India's Mahatma Gandhi and universal suffrage), he stepped out in the street and was run down by a car. He needed a prescription for "alcoholic spirits" because this was during Prohibition, and it's not clear if the 250 cc "minimum requirement" of alcohol — that's 8.5 ounces — was daily or total. You can read more about Churchill's "New York misadventure" from Churchill's own account in The Daily Mail, or in summarized form Open Culture.

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us