Speed Reads

the day after

The GOP now controls the White House, Senate, House, a Supreme Court pick, and most governorships and state houses

Donald Trump wasn't the only big winner in the early hours of Wednesday morning. For only the second time since 1929, the Republican Party will control the House, Senate, the White House, most governorships and state houses, and will decide a Supreme Court pick.

The 109th United States Congress, from 2005 to 2007, also saw a Republican majority in the House and the Senate, with President George W. Bush in the White House. During those years, Bush also appointed conservative Justice John Roberts, who replaced Justice William Rehnquist after his death in 2005.

By comparison, though, Trump and his Republican Congress will be in power likely for a minimum of four years:

The 2018 midterm elections are much more difficult for Democrats than Republicans. In the Senate, Democrats are expected to defend anywhere from 23 to 25 seats, while Republicans will likely have to defend just eight.

Further down the ballot, 2010 redistricting by Republican-dominated state legislatures has made it very difficult for Democrats to gain a foothold in the House and in state chambers. They'll have to win back those chambers by 2020 in order to redraw lines in their favor. [The Washington Post]

In that sense, at least, the last time the Republican Party was as powerful as it will be come January was a stretch of years between 1921 and 1929. During that time, three Supreme Court justices were appointed. Additionally, The Washington Post notes, "It's almost a footnote that Republicans tied a 94-year-old record of control of governor's mansions Tuesday night; they now hold 34 of them. (Though Democrats will have a chance to chip away at that in 2018 when at least 14 Republican governors' mansions open up thanks to term limits.)"

As many have pointed out in viral tweets, 1929 was the beginning of the Great Depression.