Archaeologists discover the 4,400-year-old tomb of a powerful Egyptian woman

A painting in a 4,400-year-old Egyptian tomb
(Image credit: BBC/Screenshot)

Egyptian archaeologists have revealed the discovery of a 4,400-year-old tomb belonging to Hetpet, a powerful official in the royal court of the Old Kingdom who served as a priestess to the fertility goddess, Hathor.

"We know of course that [Hetpet] was a high official and that she had a strong link with the royal palace," said Egyptian Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Anani on Saturday. Her tomb features rare wall paintings al-Anani said are in "a very good conservation condition, depicting Hetpet standing in different hunting and fishing scenes or ... receiving offerings from her children."

The tomb's location has been undergoing excavation for more than a century. It is home to the graves of many royal officials and is expected to be a source of new finds for years to come. Watch a BBC report with footage of the tomb below. Bonnie Kristian

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us