Alaska wants 50 percent of its electricity to come from renewable sources

A marshy, tundra landscape in Alaska.
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Alaska, a conservative-leaning state heavily dependent on oil and gas, is urgently pursuing a number of policies to usher in greater efficient and renewable energy, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker (I) commissioned a climate task force in October to create strategies for reducing emissions and addressing immediate effects of climate change. Much of Alaska's carbon footprint comes from the oil it exports for use in cars, Times explained, and in a drafted proposal the task force suggested instituting a tax on carbon emitters, and directing the generated revenue toward local energy efficiency programs.

Another ambitious policy proposal suggested generating 50 percent of the state's electricity from renewable sources, including hydropower, solar power, and wind power. The 50-percent target is an increase from a previous 33 percent goal, which was established in 2016.

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The state's infrastructure and residential coastlines have already taken significant damage from warming temperatures, the Times reports, and the task force also calls for more research on ocean acidification and food insecurity. Read more about Alaska's efforts at The New York Times.

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