July 27, 2019

Another weekend, another member of Congress for President Trump to target.

Trump tweeted about House Oversight Committee Chair Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) on Saturday morning, calling him as a "brutal bully" and criticizing his district, which contains the city of Baltimore, as "far worse and more dangerous" than the southern border, the conditions of which Cummings has criticized in the past. Trump went on to describe Baltimore as a "rat and rodent infested mess."

Like his racist tweets direct at four Democratic congresswomen earlier this month, Trump's shot at Cummings and Baltimore has already drawn heavy criticism from commentators. CNN news anchor Victor Blackwell, who is from Baltimore, delivered an emotional monologue about Trump's comments and said that people from Baltimore are "proud of their community." While fighting back tears, Blackwell said that Baltimore's citizens pledge allegiance to the flag just as people do in districts represented by lawmakers who support Trump. "They are Americans, too," he said.

Other journalists pointed out that Trump's tweets were hypocritical, especially in light of his attacks on the congresswomen, including Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), who Trump has accused of being anti-American.

Read more reactions at Mediaite. Tim O'Donnell

4:09 p.m.

Michael Bloomberg is presumably running for president.

The billionaire and former New York City mayor announced earlier this year that he wasn't running for president, and he hasn't said anything to indicate he's changed his mind. And yet his filing with the Federal Election Commission as a 2020 candidate and, now, a $19 million ad buy across the U.S., suggests a reversal is imminent.

Bloomberg has been scooping TV ads across the U.S., spending at least $19 million in more than 25 markets as of Friday afternoon, CNBC reports. They include massive buys in California, Massachusetts, Colorado, and other states that come after the first four contests on the 2020 primary schedule. The biggest hits come in Los Angeles and Chicago, where he's spent more than $700,000, and there's also a large buy in the Florida market that includes President Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort.

Bloomberg missed the deadline to file for the New Hampshire primary, and these ad purchases seem to solidify that he's going to skip the early primary and caucus states altogether. The ads will run from Nov. 25–Dec. 3, and are just a fraction of the $100 million digital campaign Bloomberg is said to embark on in his middleground run for president. Kathryn Krawczyk

4:06 p.m.

About 80 percent of adolescents around the globe are getting less than the recommended 60 minutes of exercise, according to the World Health Organization's first-ever global study of physical activity among kids ages 11 to 17.

The study found that girls were less active than boys worldwide, with the biggest gender gaps in the United States and Ireland. It also mentioned that many sports in the United States seem designed to attract boys more than girls. In a press release on Friday, author Dr. Regina Guthold of WHO, pushed for "urgent policy action" to particularly "promote and retain girls' participation in physical activity."

Leisure activities today tend to be "more sedentary and screen-based rather than being outdoor exercise, sport or play," Dr. Juana Willumsen, a WHO expert on physical activity, told CNBC.

But the WHO's study asserts that there is no compromise when it comes to health. "Four in every five adolescents do not experience the enjoyment and social, physical, and mental health benefits of regular physical activity," Fiona Bull, co-author of the study told Reuters, and urged policymakers worldwide to "act now for the health of this and future young generations." Ramisa Rob

3:05 p.m.

You know the drill!

It's Friday, which means Jane Fonda is protesting climate change in Washington, D.C. This week's "Fire Drill Friday" features appearances by actresses Diane Lane and Piper Perabo, as well as The Good Place actor Manny Jacinto and model Amber Valletta, per The Hollywood Reporter. Lane, Perabo, and Valletta were arrested after they reportedly blocked traffic in front of the Supreme Court, but Fonda avoided being detained this week.

The woman who started it all has been playing it cool in recent weeks, as another jail stay could be lengthy due to Fonda's first four arrests. Organizers fear she could face up to 90 days if she's arrested again, Deadline reports, which would render her unable to participate in the scene-stealing protests. Fonda previously spent one night in jail, which she said involved some one-on-one time with cockroaches.

The protests have drawn numerous A-listers thus far, and Fonda has teased that there are more big names to come. But any Hollywood stars looking to grab a slice of the climate change spotlight should book their flights to D.C. soon — Fonda has to be back in Los Angeles come January to film Grace and Frankie. Marianne Dodson

3:02 p.m.

That one's gotta hurt.

On Friday, former Vice President Joe Biden announced that he'd earned the endorsement of Oliver Davis Jr., a black community leader in Indiana. The endorsement got some heavy play for someone who's not even close to a national political figure — but all makes sense considering Davis is from Pete Buttigieg's hometown.

Davis is the vice president of the common council in South Bend, Indiana, where Buttigieg is mayor. In fact, Davis even ran for mayor earlier this year after Buttigieg declined to run, but couldn't beat the 4,447 votes that Buttigieg's chief of staff earned to clinch the Democratic nomination. Still, Davis is one of the longest-serving members of the city's common council, and focused on Biden's long tenure in his endorsement. "In times like these, when the political winds are fiercely blowing across our country, it's important for us to have an experienced leader who has been through the diverse storms of life to guide our country," he said.

It's hard not to read that as a shot at Buttigieg, who is 40 years Biden's junior and has faced major criticism over his lack of political and life experience and dismal showing among black voters. And if that weren't enough of a blow, Biden was sure to point out that Davis "joins two other African American elected officials from Indiana" in backing Biden as well. Kathryn Krawczyk

1:41 p.m.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) is making some big, structural additions to her 2020 presidential campaign's leadership team.

On Friday, Warren announced that Reps. Deb Haaland (D-N.M.), Katie Porter (D-Calif.), and Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) would be joining her campaign as co-chairs. All three congressmembers were first elected in 2018's Democratic House sweep, and have remained in the spotlight ever since.

Warren released a statement to announce the representatives' appointments, praising their work in 2018 and how they've continued to campaign for Warren across the country since endorsing her earlier this year. With it came a video of Haaland, Porter, and Pressley speaking at Warren rallies and praising her political rhetoric so far.

Pressley diverged from the rest of the progressive "Squad" earlier this month when she announced her endorsement of Warren. Haaland stirred up controversy with her endorsement given that she was the first Native American woman to be elected to Congress, and Warren made a campaign video to show a DNA test proved she had a Native American ancestor several generations back. Kathryn Krawczyk

12:56 p.m.

You've probably heard Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) is a vegan — but did you know he's also a former Division 1 football player?

If you need a refresher, look no further than The Washington Post's most recent presidential candidate TikTok, which features a laser-focused Booker running to make his flight to Iowa. Booker slams into an unsuspecting passerby (played by Post TikTok creator Dave Jorgenson) in the process, knocking him to the ground and reminding everyone that, despite his dietary preferences, Booker's got some meat on his bones.

Bold of Jorgenson to agree to being pummeled by Booker, seeing as the presidential candidate played tight end at Stanford University in 1989 and 1990. The TikTok creator did follow up acknowledging Booker's former athletic career — hopefully he'll book it out of there faster in the future. Marianne Dodson

12:54 p.m.

Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) has it out for a Purple Heart veteran.

When Lt. Col Alexander Vindman testified in the impeachment hearing into President Trump on Tuesday, Trump and other Republicans questioned his military bonafides and seemed skeptical of the fact that he doesn't know who the Ukraine whistleblower is. And in a Friday tweet, Blackburn kept the attacks going, tweeting that "Vindictive Vindman is the 'whistleblower’s' handler."

There's a lot wrong with this short tweet. First, it suggests Vindman has something against Trump, furthering the right-wing rhetoric that claims he's less American because he was born in the Soviet Union. And second, it falsely claims Vindman knows the identity of the whistleblower — something that isn't true, but didn't stop Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) from trying to get Vindman to spill their identity on Tuesday. And third, it's an outright smear on a high-ranking military official who received heaps of praise for his service before, during, and after his hearing. Kathryn Krawczyk

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